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5 new books to read in March

March 1, 2022, 12:00 PM UTC

A guide on how to turn your respective sci-fi or comic book obsession into a side hustle; the untold story of just how Georgia went from red to blue (for now); and a look at how the untimely death of a young tech and retail visionary reveals our misguided worship of entrepreneurs and outdated stigmas around mental health.

Here is a selection of new books being published this month.

Inclusion on Purpose book cover
Courtesy of MIT Press

Inclusion on Purpose: An Intersectional Approach to Creating a Culture of Belonging at Work by Ruchika Tulshyan with a foreword by Ijeoma Oluo

Available March 1

Inclusion, diversity, and representation in the workplace have been hotly discussed topics over the past two years, which, to start, is long overdue. That said, it isn’t enough just to talk about these issues—they require active and persistent work to make any kind of lasting, positive change. Ruchika Tulshyan, CEO of consulting firm Candour, debunks a number of recent workplace self-help theories (like “leaning in” or establishing a “level playing field” or hiring someone because they fit within the preexisting office culture), while offering a guide to dismantling workplace bias, with a focus on the experience of women of color, who are subject to both gender and racial biases.

'Turn Your Fandom Into Cash: A Geeky Guide to Turn Your Passion Into a Business (or at Least a Side Hustle)'
Courtesy of Career Press

Turn Your Fandom Into Cash: A Geeky Guide to Turn Your Passion Into a Business (or at Least a Side Hustle) by Carol Pinchefsky with a forward by Jennifer Frazier

Available March 1

Author Carol Pinchefsky is a self-described “avowed geek,” having written frequently about science fiction for Syfy.com, Forbes, and Playboy as well as serving as the humor competition editor for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. With all that experience in tow, Pinchefsky shares tips on how to make the most of your sci-fi obsessions—within legal bounds, of course.

'Happy at Any Cost: The Revolutionary Vision and Fatal Quest of Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh'
Courtesy of Simon & Schuster

Happy at Any Cost: The Revolutionary Vision and Fatal Quest of Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh by Kirsten Grind and Katherine Sayre

Available March 15

The death of Zappos founder Tony Hsieh at age 46 in November 2020 shocked the business world, as well as those closest to the e-commerce pioneer. Wall Street Journal reporters Kirsten Grind and Katherine Sayre offer a closer look at Hsieh’s final months and days before his untimely death, examining where things went wrong for the lauded CEO, who championed happiness and positive corporate culture before it became a mainstream talking point.

'Flipped: How Georgia Turned Purple and Broke the Monopoly on Republican Power'
Courtesy of Viking

Flipped: How Georgia Turned Purple and Broke the Monopoly on Republican Power by Greg Bluestein

Available March 22

Ahead of the 2022 midterm elections, Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Greg Bluestein offers the definitive account of how the runoff elections of 2020—resulting in the election of Democrats Jon Ossoff and the Rev. Raphael Warnock to the U.S. Senate—transformed Georgia from a deep red state to the most closely watched purple battleground in the nation. While multiple voting rights protection bills hang in the balance in the wake of that election, Bluestein charts how now-President Joe Biden’s victory in Georgia will affect both Republican and Democratic strategies for years to come.

'Ten Steps to Nanette: A Memoir Situation'
Courtesy of Ballantine Books

Ten Steps to Nanette: A Memoir Situation by Hannah Gadsby

Available March 29

In what is already one of the most highly anticipated celebrity memoirs of the year, comedian Hannah Gadsby follows up on the success of her one-woman Netflix special, Nanette, with a candid autobiography about her journey to where she is now. That journey includes struggles with late-in-life diagnoses of autism and ADHD as well as coming to understand her queer identity, made all the more challenging while growing up in an isolated town in Tasmania, Australia, where homosexuality was illegal until 1997.

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