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5 new books to read in September

September 1, 2021, 11:00 AM UTC

A pair of timely guides to dealing with anxiety and burnout, a powerful memoir from the founder of the #MeToo movement, a coming-of-age memoir from a venerated journalist about three girls from Chicago’s Bronzeville neighborhood, and a call to action on gender violence from a leading figure in the fight for women’s rights since the early 1990s.

Here is a selection of new books being published this month.

September 2021 Books-Good-Anxiety
“Good Anxiety: Harnessing the Power of the Most Misunderstood Emotion”
Courtesy of Atria Books

Good Anxiety: Harnessing the Power of the Most Misunderstood Emotion by Dr. Wendy Suzuki

Available Sept. 7

Mental health is finally getting the attention it deserves in the public consciousness, and one of the afflictions that is starting to be recognized better is anxiety. And after the past two years, our collective anxiety has gone through the roof. Wendy Suzuki, a professor of neural science and psychology in the Center for Neural Science at New York University, has written what is being pitched as an essential guide, with tips on coping mechanisms as well as training techniques for communication and productivity for anyone who finds themselves suffering from anxiety, stress, or a case of the “what-ifs.”

September 2021 Books-bronzeville
“Three Girls From Bronzeville: A Uniquely American Memoir of Race, Fate, and Sisterhood”
Courtesy of Simon & Schuster

Three Girls From Bronzeville: A Uniquely American Memoir of Race, Fate, and Sisterhood by Dawn Turner

Available Sept. 7

Journalist Dawn Turner—whose résumé includes work at the Chicago Tribune, the Washington Post, PBS NewsHour, CBS Sunday Morning, and NPR’s Morning Edition—has penned a coming-of-age memoir, following three Black girls growing up in Chicago’s Bronzeville district. At the heart of the book is analyzing how these paths diverged—specifically the author’s own versus that of her sister, who died at age 25 from a heart attack while under the influence, and her best friend, who was imprisoned for decades after being convicted of murder.

September 2021 Books-unbound
“Unbound: My Story of Liberation and the Birth of the Me Too Movement”
Courtesy of Flatiron Books: An Oprah Book

Unbound: My Story of Liberation and the Birth of the Me Too Movement by Tarana Burke

Available Sept. 14

In what started out as only two words, #MeToo has become one of the most powerful and recognized phrases as well as movements of the 21st century. A survivor of sexual assault in her childhood, founder Tarana Burke admits she didn’t always have the courage to speak out about what happened to her. Unbound traces Burke’s journey from blaming herself to confronting her past and harnessing those realizations as motivation—and in the process, empowering countless other women to do the same.

“Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence”

Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence by Anita Hill

Available Sept. 28

After the 1991 Senate confirmation hearings for U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, Anita Hill became a leading figure in the fight for women’s rights and against gender-based violence. Drawing on her years as a legal scholar (currently a professor of social policy, law, and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at Brandeis University), public speaker, and published author, Believing is a call-to-action in understanding, recognizing, and answering how the horror of gender-based violence permeates every level of society, from the home to local communities to the workplace.

September 2021 Books-burnout-epidemic
“The Burnout Epidemic: The Rise of Chronic Stress and How We Can Fix It”
Courtesy of Harvard Business Review Press

The Burnout Epidemic: The Rise of Chronic Stress and How We Can Fix It by Jennifer Moss 

Available Sept. 28

It’s only September, and yet it’s clear that “burnout” is one of the most frequently used words of 2021. It seems just about everyone is suffering from burnout in some fashion, but how we each cope with it is different. There are a number of books that can offer tips to handling burnout, and nationally syndicated radio columnist Jennifer Moss has a more up-to-date take on a crisis reaching a boiling point as businesses that let their employees work remotely during the pandemic struggle with reopening offices.

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