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Megyn Kelly Makes a Clean Break With Fox News

Megyn Kelly’s messy exit from Fox News is getting cleaned up.

On Wednesday, the Wall Street Journal reported that the star anchor has signed a formal employment contract with NBC. The news comes after a series of mixed messages from Kelly’s former employer and spokeswoman.

Back in January, NBC announced that Megyn Kelly would be taking on a triple role at the network: host of an unnamed daytime news program, anchor of a Sunday night news show, and contributor to NBC’s special political programming and other big-event coverage. The network said Kelly’s new gig is a part of a “multi-year agreement,” though it failed to disclose how much her contract was worth.

But shortly after NBC’s announcement it remained unclear whether the anchor had negotiated her exit from her former employer, Fox News. According to the Journal, Kelly’s spokeswoman Leslee Dart said in March that “the terms of the termination [of her contract with Fox] are still being negotiated.”

Dart’s statement contradicted an announcement by Fox News, which said it released Kelly from her contract on March 9—four months before it expired on July 1.

Now, however, both sides seem to be in agreement when it comes to which network Kelly is working for. Her morning NBC show is expected to take either the 9 a.m. or 10 a.m. slot and will likely debut in the fall. Her prime-time Sunday show could start as early as this summer.

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The news comes at a time of turmoil for Fox News. The network’s former chairman, Roger Ailes, stepped down this summer after being sued by former anchor Gretchen Carlson for sexual harassment. Kelly has also alleged that Ailes made unwanted advances toward her. Ailes denies the claims.

Just this month, at least 44 companies have pulled their advertisements from The O’Reilly Factor after a New York Times investigation revealed that host Bill O’Reilly had paid a combined $13 million to five women to keep them from pursuing litigation or speaking out publicly about accusations of harassment against him. O’Reilly says the claims have no merit.