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5 new books to read in May

May 1, 2022, 11:00 AM UTC

A new biography about one of the most legendary (and polarizing) figures in modern media; an easy (and even fun) guide to the ins and outs of what to do with your money; and a new and deeply reported examination of George Floyd’s America.

Here is a selection of new books being published this month.

‘Disrupting the Game: From the Bronx to the Top of Nintendo’
Courtesy of HarperCollins Leadership

Disrupting the Game: From the Bronx to the Top of Nintendo by Reggie Fils-Aimé

Available May 3

Penned by the former president and chief operating officer of Nintendo, publisher HarperCollins touts the pre-orders for this memoir-meets-leadership guide is already off the charts. It helps that Reggie Fils-Aimé has a massive social following in the tech and gaming communities, with 600,000 followers on Twitter alone.

‘The No Club: Putting a Stop to Women’s Dead-End Work’
Courtesy of Simon & Schuster

The No Club: Putting a Stop to Women’s Dead-End Work by Linda Babcock, Brenda Peyser, Lise Vesterlund, and Laurie Weingart

Available May 3

After finding they were working themselves ragged and still trailing behind their male colleagues on the career ladder, professors Linda Babcock, Brenda Peyser, Lise Vesterlund, and Laurie Weingart found that they had enough, and started “The No Club.” The core argument in this book is that women are constantly asked to do the office work no one wants to do—interviewing interns, picking up the slack of their colleagues, organizing office parties, etc.—and lots of it. Considering how women are programmed by society to be people pleasers since birth, it can be hard for us to say no. But this book is designed to help you do just that—learn how to stand up for yourself and how to say no to doing unpaid work that is going to do absolutely nothing for your career.

‘Anna: The Biography’
Courtesy of Gallery Books

Anna: The Biography by Amy Odell

Available May 3

What is there to say about Anna Wintour that hasn’t already been said? Apparently quite a bit, based on a new biography about the Vogue editor-in-chief, who has held the reins of the most powerful magazine in fashion for more than three decades—for better or worse, depending on who is talking. And veteran fashion journalist Amy Odell spoke with more than 250 people for this new book, including Tom Ford, Grace Coddington, Serena Williams, and more.

‘How to Money: Your Ultimate Visual Guide to the Basics of Finance’
Courtesy of Roaring Brook Press

How to Money: Your Ultimate Visual Guide to the Basics of Finance by Jean Chatzky and Kathryn Tuggle

Available May 10

Learning how to manage one’s personal finances comes easier for some than others, and many people are visual learners. This illustrated guidebook from Jean Chatzky, financial editor on NBC’s Today show and CEO of digital media company HerMoney, and Kathryn Tuggle, editor-in-chief of HerMoney, breaks down the basics of money from how to earn it to managing it to using it. That includes basic budget planning, managing loan payments, and learning what your credit score does for you. (This would make a great grad gift for anyone coming out of high school, college, or even graduate school.)

‘His Name Is George Floyd: One Man’s Life and the Struggle for Racial Justice’
Courtesy of Viking

His Name Is George Floyd: One Man’s Life and the Struggle for Racial Justice by Robert Samuels and Toluse Olorunnipa

Available May 17

Publishing just before the one year anniversary of George Floyd’s tragic death and murder that sparked protests for racial justice across the globe, this new biography from two Washington Post reporters trace how systemic racism shaped Floyd’s life and legacy. Drawing upon hundreds of interviews and new reporting, the authors juxtapose Floyd’s life as a Black man in America—from being raised in the projects of Houston’s Third Ward to becoming a father to his search for a better life—to the nation’s own troubled history of institutional racism, researching Floyd’s family’s roots in slavery amid the tobacco fields of North Carolina to school segregation to the broken prison system.

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