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Hillary Clinton Is Considering Female VP Candidates

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) arrive for Kerry's confirmation hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to become the next Secretary of State in the Hart Senate Office Building on Captiol Hill January 24, 2013 in Washington, DC. Nominated by President Barack Obama to succeed Clinton as Secretary of State, Kerry has served on this committee for 28 years and was chairman for four of those years.U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) arrive for Kerry's confirmation hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to become the next Secretary of State in the Hart Senate Office Building on Captiol Hill January 24, 2013 in Washington, DC. Nominated by President Barack Obama to succeed Clinton as Secretary of State, Kerry has served on this committee for 28 years and was chairman for four of those years.
Hillary Clinton and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) arrive for Kerry's confirmation hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to become the next Secretary of State in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill January 24, 2013 in Washington, D.C.Photograph by Chip Somodevilla—Getty Images

Could 2016 put not just one, but two women in the White House?

Hillary Clinton, the frontrunner for the Democratic nomination, has a number of women on her short list of options for vice president, reports The Boston Globe.

“There is no question that there will be women on that list,” Clinton’s campaign chairman, John Podesta, told Globe writer Annie Linskey, though he declined to name names.

While “the notion of two women on the ticket is shocking” to some, writes Linskey, it’s not a totally ludicrous idea given the Clintons’ proclivity to making unconventional running mate choices, as Bill Clinton did when he picked Al Gore (a fellow young, Southern Democrat) in 1992.

Linskey speculates that Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) would be a top pick for the job because she “adds the obvious benefit of providing a bridge to supporters of Senator Bernie Sanders” and “is one of the few Democratic women with national name recognition and a big following among progressives.”

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While it is possible that Clinton’s VP will be a woman, the Washington Post‘s Chris Cillizza argues that it is unlikely to be Warren, given that she is still the only female Senator who has yet to endorse the former First Lady. “Not only has Warren not embraced Clinton, she has been a thorn in the front-runner’s side for much of the 2016 race,” he writes, due to Warren’s allegations that campaign contributions from Wall Street changed Clinton’s mind about the need to overhaul bankruptcy laws.

In addition to Warren, other names swirling around include Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano, Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA), and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME).

Clinton campaign representatives could not be reached for comment at this time.