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How Microsoft is fighting revenge porn

Microsoft launched a new reporting page on its website Wednesday where victims of revenge porn can report violations, making it easier for victims to quickly alert the company.

For each request, Microsoft (MSFT) will remove all links to photos and videos from search results in Bing as well as remove access to the content itself when shared on OneDrive or Xbox Live. The move follows a similar decision by Google (GOOG) last month. The reporting webpage is currently only available in English but will expand to other languages in the coming weeks.

Microsoft takes revenge porn seriously, acknowledging the harm it can cause to every aspect of a victim’s life, sometimes even leading to suicide. The reporting mechanism is just one small step to make it easier for victims to take action, but there’s still more needed to address the issue across the public and private sectors, the company said.

“It’s important to remember, for example, that removing links in search results to content hosted elsewhere online doesn’t actually remove the content from the Internet,” the company wrote in a blog post on the issue. “Victims still need stronger protections across the Web and around the world.”

Microsoft plans to expand on these efforts in partnership with leaders and experts on the subject worldwide.