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Amazon Is Looking to Fill 30,000 Full-Time Jobs

For the second time in roughly two years, Amazon is looking to bring on tens of thousands of full-time employees, launching a series of job fairs next week with the goal of increasing its payroll by 30,000 people.

The event, dubbed Amazon Career Day, will see job fairs take place in six cities on Sept. 17:   Arlington, Va. (home of its upcoming second headquarters), Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Nashville, Tennessee, and Seattle. All of the positions come with benefit opportunities, says Amazon, and salaries start at $15 per hour.

“These are jobs with highly competitive compensation and full-benefits from day one, as well as training opportunities to gain new skills in high-demand fields such as robotics and machine learning,” said founder and CEO Jeff Bezos in a statement.

Beyond the permanent positions, the company is also starting to hire tens of thousands of seasonal jobs, it said. Those jobs also start at $15 per hour.

This is the second massive job fair Amazon has hosted in, roughly, the past two years. In August 2017, “Amazon Jobs Day” aimed to fill 50,000 openings, holding job fairs in a dozen warehouses around the country.

That didn’t go exactly as planned, though, as just 20,000 people showed up to learn about the jobs (and it’s unclear how many were offered positions).

The company is looking for a wide variety of workers, ranging from people to work in its fulfillment centers to software developers to computer scientists. To register for the job fairs or learn more about the open positions, prospective candidates are encouraged to visit amazon.jobs/careerday.

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