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Apple CEO Tim Cook on DACA: ‘My Goal Would Be to Monopolize the World’s Talent’

Apple CEO Tim Cook has taken issue with DACA, and now, he’s shared his own idea for an American immigration policy.

Speaking to former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg at the Bloomberg Global Business Forum on Wednesday, Cook said that his immigration policy would center on getting more people into the U.S. instead of trying to find ways to limit those who can enter the country.

“If I were a country leader right now, my goal would be to monopolize the world’s talent,” Cook said, according to Quartz, which earlier reported on his comments. “I want every smart person coming to my country because smart people create jobs. So, I would have a very aggressive plan not just to let a few people in—I would be recruiting.”

Cook has been among the more outspoken critics of President Donald Trump’s proposed plan to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), which saves children of illegal immigrants from deportation. Earlier this month, Cook sent an internal memo to his employees, saying that he was “deeply dismayed” by the President’s proposal. He added that more than 250 Apple (AAPL) employees would be subject to the change and could be “cast out of the only country they’ve ever called home.”

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During his discussion with Bloomberg, Cook said it’s “the biggest issue of our time.” He added that he’s “shocked” that there’s debate over the topic.

Cook’s comments are the latest in a string of criticisms he’s thrust at the Trump administration on topics ranging from immigration and climate change to Charlottesville and the President’s initial response to its racism and violence.

However, Cook has also taken a proactive approach, saying that he wants to use his stature as one of the top American corporate executives to champion efforts that aim at improving the world.

“This goes to the values of being American,” Cook said of DACA at the Bloomberg event. “This is: ‘Are we human? Are we acting in a track of morality?’”