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Trump Tariff Buying Guide: When to Buy Imported Chinese Tech, From Apple to Roku

The Trump administration delayed a 10% tariff on some Chinese-made products on Tuesday. Apple’s iPhone was one of the main beneficiaries of the move, but other tech gadgets weren’t so lucky.

Here’s a rundown of which technologies got the temporary reprieve and what offerings will still get hit:

Tariffs delayed until Dec. 15:

  • Telephones for cellular networks or for other wireless networks. That means iPhones and other many other smartphones assembled in China.
  • Portable automatic data processing machines, not over 10 kg, consisting at least a central processing unit, keyboard, and display. That covers laptops and tablets, including MacBook, iPads, and iPod touch devices.
  • The Apple TV box and Roku video-streaming devices.
  • External computer monitors. 
  • Computer keyboards.
  • Wired headphones.
  • Remote control gear for video game consoles.

Tariffs effective Sept. 1:

  • Base stations. This typically means cellular networking gear.
  • Semiconductor media, solid state non‐volatile storage devices. This may cover Nand flash, which is the key storage media in the iPhone and other smartphones.
  • Lithium‐ion batteries and battery cases.
  • Machines for the reception, conversion and transmission or regeneration of voice, images, or other data. This covers products such as the Apple Watch, AirPods, HomePod, and some Beats headphones.
  • Parts of telephone sets; parts of other apparatus for the transmission or reception of voice, images or other data, including apparatus. This may include repair parts for iPhones and other handsets.
  • Mac computers.
  • Apple Watch bands.

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