See What the Total Solar Eclipse Looks Like Across America

August 21, 2017, 2:52 PM UTC
Ken Spencer of Buckeye, Arizona, assists people as they look at the sun through a solar filter-equipped telescope at the Lowell Observatory Solar Eclipse Experience in Madras
Ken Spencer (R) of Buckeye, Arizona, assists people as they look at the sun through a solar filter-equipped telescope at the Lowell Observatory Solar Eclipse Experience in Madras, Oregon, U.S., August 20, 2017. Picture taken August 20, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Redmond - RTS1CLOE
Jason Redmond — Reuters

We’ve only been waiting 38 years for the total solar eclipse of Aug. 21, commonly referred to as The Great American Eclipse—and the astronomical phenomenon has finally arrived.

People have flocked to 14 states across middle America from Oregon to South Carolina to get a prime viewing spot of the solar eclipse, wherein the moon will block the entire face of the sun and cause darkness. The many Airbnb bookings, Waffle Houses, hotels and flights offering solar eclipse deals prove how big of a deal this is. Some towns have even shut down their airports and football stadiums for viewing parties.

Unfortunately, only people in the United States will be able to see this event, with the solar eclipse estimated to start just after 10 a.m. PST in Oregon and end around 3 p.m. EST in South Carolina. Those people will get the ultimate eclipse experience: Two full minutes of sudden darkness, long enough for the air to feel noticeably colder. Even those who aren’t in the path of the complete eclipse will experience a partial eclipse.

Click through the gallery above of the lucky people fortunate enough to travel or live in the best view of the path of the solar eclipse. We will continue to update the gallery throughout the day.

Bummed about missing this one? There’s plenty of time to plan for the next U.S. eclipse on April 8, 2024. On that day, the shadow will across the country in an arc that starts in Texas and ends in Maine.