Skip to Content

Amazon Is Offering Free 2-Hour Flower Delivery for Valentine’s Day

Red roses packed for despatch wait for tRed roses packed for despatch wait for t
Red roses packed for despatch wait for transportation at the International Flower Auction Bangalore (IFAB) Limited on the eve of Valentine's Day in Bangalore on February 13, 2012. Photograph by Manjunath Kiran — AFP/Getty Images

Your Valentine’s Day gifting just got a lot easier.

‘If you’ve forgotten to get a present for your significant other, or haven’t placed an order on a bouquet just yet, Amazon (AMZN) has you covered. The online retailer is offering free two-hour delivery of fresh flowers from Saturday, February 11 through Tuesday, February 14 on its Prime Now service. The flowers will come from KaBloom, an online floral delivery service, and some select cities will also deliver flowers from local stores like Eataly, Plum Market, and Sprouts Farmers Market.

Related: 11 Tech Gifts Your Valentine Will Love

Prime Now, Amazon’s one- to two-hour delivery service, is available to Prime members. All you have to do is enter your zip code, search for the items you want (flowers, food, etc.), and check out. You can choose delivery windows so local couriers will deliver the items to your doorstep (or your significant other’s office or house). It’s available in 30 cities across the U.S. Normally two-hour delivery is free and one-hour delivery is $7.99 in select cities.

Get Data Sheet, Fortune‘s technology newsletter.

And if a big bouquet of roses isn’t your Valentine’s thing, you can also send last-minute gifts, candy, cards, or even lunch from a favorite restaurant. You could even send a bottle of wine as a present, too. Prime Now is also offering great deals on chocolate boxes—buy two Cailler chocolate boxes and get 25 percent off, or get a free MARS candy item (M&Ms, Snickers, Twix, etc.) with the promo code VDAY17.

Related: You Won’t Go Wrong With These Valentine’s Day Gifts for Her

Take a look at all the last-minute Valentine’s Day offerings on Prime Now, and for those who don’t have Prime, you can sign up for a free 30-day trial.

Correction (02/13/17 11:26 a.m.): A previous version of the original Real Simple article said Amazon was offering free one-hour delivery. It is, in fact, free two-hour delivery—not one. There’s still a fee for one-hour delivery.

We’ve included affiliate links in this article. Click here to learn what those are.
This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com.