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The Obama Administration Just Delivered Another Big Victory to Unions

Protesters hold signs at a rally in support of minimum wage increase in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, April 15, 2015. Fast-food workers held rallies in 236 U.S. cities Wednesday in their biggest protest yet for higher pay and union rights. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/BloombergProtesters hold signs at a rally in support of minimum wage increase in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, April 15, 2015. Fast-food workers held rallies in 236 U.S. cities Wednesday in their biggest protest yet for higher pay and union rights. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg
Protesters hold signs at a rally in support of minimum wage increase in New York, on April 15, 2015. Photograph by Victor J. Blue—Bloomberg Finance LP via Getty Images

In the never ending battle between unions and employers, big labor is set to score a victory.

The Obama Administration will unveil a new rule Wednesday that requires employers who hire outside lawyers and consultants to help fight unionization to disclose information about those relationships more frequently, according to a Labor Department press release.

“Today, employers commonly engage third-party consultants in crafting and delivering anti-union messages to workers. Workers often do not know when employers engage consultants behind the scenes to influence their decisions,” the statement reads. “To address this lack of transparency, a new rule from the U.S. Department of Labor will require reporting of employer-consultant, or “persuader” agreements – to complement the information that unions already report on their organizing expenditures, resulting in better information for workers making decisions on whether or not to form a union or bargain collectively.”

Business groups, like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, oppose the regulation. “It is a shame that the [Labor Department] would expend its resources on a regulation that is so clearly one-sided and intended solely to benefit its big labor benefactors, rather than focusing on initiatives that would invigorate a still-underperforming economy,” Randy Johnson, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s senior vice president of labor, told the Wall Street Journal.