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The Broadsheet: February 24th

Good morning, Broadsheet readers! Valentina (@valzarya) here again this morning. Tech CEOs still don’t get this whole diversity thing, California’s workers get good news, and Melinda Gates shares her priorities for 2016. Have a great Wednesday.

EVERYONE’S TALKING

• What will it take? Sukhinder Singh Cassidy, founder of theBoardlist (a LinkedIn for female director candidates) shared findings from a survey of tech CEOs exclusively with Fortune. The most surprising—and frustrating—of all: One in three respondents still don’t believe gender diversity on boards is important. Fortune

ALSO IN THE HEADLINES

Cali, here we come. 15 years ago, California became the first state to guarantee workers paid family leave. Now, a measure to make the state program attract more low-wage workers is on the fast-track to the legislature. Under the new proposal, workers who earn minimum wage would earn 70% of their salaries—up from the current 55%. Los Angeles Times

Melinda’s mission. Melinda Gates and husband Bill have published their annual joint letter, outlining 2016 philanthropic priorities. Melinda’s focus this year is on reducing the time women spend on unpaid labor.  Fortune

High-five, Honda. Honda Motor Co. announced that it will appoint its first female operating officer, Asako Suzuki. Fortune

• Meet Melody. American Girl has introduced a new doll from the civil rights era to celebrate Black History Month and the company’s 30th anniversary. Melody Ellison is only the third African American doll in American Doll’s historical line.  Time

Hulu over HollywoodA new Annenberg study finds that women filled only 28.7% of all speaking roles in films and made up only 3.4% of directors. In scripted series (both TV and online), they had 37.3% of speaking roles and made up 14.7% of directors. USC Annenberg

MOVERS AND SHAKERS: Dr. Laurie Glimcher, dean of the Weill Cornell Medical College, will become the next president and CEO of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

Educating India. In 2014, the Indian government passed a law mandating that a listed company have at least one woman on its board. While this has helped increase gender diversity in business, India’s academic institutions remain extremely male-dominated, with women making up just 1.4% of professors. Quartz

Big deal bikers. For the first time in years, women are publicly riding bikes around Gaza, where Hamas has traditionally enforced strict rules against adult women practicing sports.  New York Times

An inclusive runway. Tommy Hilfiger has launched its first-ever collection of children’s adaptive clothing—or clothing for kids with disabilities—in collaboration with nonprofit Runway of Dreams. The nonprofit’s founder, Mindy Scheier, talks to Motto about her mission to make fashion as inclusive as possible. Motto

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ON MY RADAR

Should dictionaries do more to confront sexism? New Yorker

Ava DuVernay to direct one of your favorite children’s books  Cosmopolitan

Why Kesha’s case is about more than Kesha  Lenny

The differences between men and women’s brains New Republic

QUOTE

I think there's something inherently different about working with females, don't you? I mean, it's just a different way of looking at life, being a woman. But I think we can handle many things at one time and I don't think that's necessarily true for men.

Melanie Griffith