By Erin Griffith
June 9, 2015

Crystal, a new email tool, uses personality data to help emailers personalize their message to the recipient’s personality. It’s not an exact science, but it provides some interesting advice. (Read more about Crystal and how it works in this story, which appears in the latest issue of Fortune.)

In honor of the Fortune 500, Crystal provided advice on emailing the CEOs of the America’s largest companies. Many of them have one thing in common: They want you to be direct. See examples of the same email, personalized eight different ways, below.

Warren Buffett, CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (No. 4 on the Fortune 500), prefers an open-ended ask, according to Crystal.

Illustration by Kacy Burdette; Courtesy of Crystal

Crystal suggests using bullet points with Tim Cook, CEO of Apple (No. 5 on the Fortune 500).

Illustration by Kacy Burdette; Courtesy of Crystal

Mary Barra, CEO of General Motors (No. 6 on the Fortune 500), prefers you offer some context, according to Crystal.

Illustration by Kacy Burdette; Courtesy of Crystal

Jeff Immelt, CEO of General Electric (No. 8 on the Fortune 500), doesn’t need specifics, according to Crystal.

Illustration by Kacy Burdette; Courtesy of Crystal

Crystal advises you keep emails to one line or less for Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon (No. 29 on the Fortune 500).

Illustration by Kacy Burdette; Courtesy of Crystal

Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook (No. 242 on the Fortune 500), wants as much information as possible, according to Crystal.

Illustration by Kacy Burdette; Courtesy of Crystal

Richard Branson isn’t a Fortune 500 CEO, but he’s as high-profile as one. Crystal suggests an enthusiastic opening.

Illustration by Kacy Burdette; Courtesy of Crystal

Arianna Huffington isn’t a Fortune 500 CEO, either—but she’s probably got plenty of incoming email. Crystal suggests leading with flattery.

Illustration by Kacy Burdette; Courtesy of Crystal

 

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