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These Are the Democratic Candidates Who Have Dropped Out of the 2020 Presidential Race—So Far

And then there were 20.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand became the latest casualty of the race for the Democratic nomination for president on Wednesday, posting on Twitter, "I think it's important to know how you can best serve."

Gillibrand didn't qualify for the September debate in Houston due to low polling numbers and campaign donors.

Rep. Seth Moulton announced his decision to end his 2020 campaign in San Francisco at the DNC’s summer meeting last week, noting that “though this campaign is not ending the way we hoped, I am leaving this race knowing that we raised issues that are vitally important.”

He was one of just three candidates who did not manage to qualify for the first debate and one of five who didn’t make it to the second debate. He reportedly plans to seek re-election for the seat in the House he currently holds. 

California Rep. Eric Swalwell was the first major candidate to suspend his campaign, announcing his decision in early July. Swalwell similarly plans to seek a fifth term representing his Northern California district. 

Former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee both announced their own decision to bow out of the race in recent days. While Inslee will seek re-election to the Washington Governor’s mansion, Hickenlooper has decided to seek the Democratic Party’s nomination for a Republican-held Senate seat in Colorado.

With Hickenlooper and Inslee’s departures, Gov. Steve Bullock of Montana is the only governor still running for president. He is unlikely to qualify for the next debate, but has not indicated whether he is considering dropping out of the race.

Less than half of the remaining candidates have qualified for the third debate. Two others are close to meeting the criteria: new entry Tom Steyer and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard. With the August 28 deadline to qualify fast approaching, more candidates may decide in the coming days and weeks to cut their losses and suspend their campaigns.

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