Skip to Content

In Kansas City, a New Nissan Leaf is Only $11,510

The 2017 Nissan Leaf.The 2017 Nissan Leaf.
The 2017 Nissan Leaf.Nissan USA

If you’re shopping for a car near Kansas City, it might be time to make like Bob Dylan and go electric.

Until January 3rd of next year, a $10,000 rebate on several models of the Nissan Leaf is available through Kansas City Power and Light. Stacked with Federal tax credits of up to $7,500 (and minus sales taxes and financing), that means buyers would pay just $11,510 for the entry-level 2016 Leaf S 24kWh.

Get Data Sheet, Fortune’s technology newsletter.

As a quick comparison, that’s less than the Kelley Blue Book price for a bare-bones used 2014 Camry. And the Leaf includes free charging for two years through Nissan (though that offer is also available in a few dozen other U.S. markets).

While the discount is officially available to “eligible KCP&L participants,” one source told CleanTechnica that you don’t actually have to be a customer to qualify. So if you’re in Chicago or Dallas and in the market for a new car, it might be time for a road trip.

On the other hand, the same source reports that 2016 models have been “wiped out” from dealerships, and 2017 models are about $1,200 more expensive. And Car and Driver gives the Leaf a middling rating, dinging it slightly on styling and features.

Though it’s generous by any standard, the rebate is just one of a good number of incentives for electric vehicles right now. State credits and rebates range from $2,000 in New York and Pennsylvania all the way up to a whopping $6,000 in Colorado. (The previously complex Colorado tax credit formula will be simplified to a flat $5,000 in 2017).

For more on electric vehicles, watch our video.

While the Kansas rebate is only available for two more weeks, the Federal $7,500 EV tax credit comes with its own, slightly less predictable timeline. That credit is tied to each manufacturer’s number of electric vehicles on the road, beginning to phase out as soon as a maker sells 200,000 cars. Most automakers have been projected to hit that cap in 2018.