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WikiLeaks Published Over 1,200 of Hillary Clinton’s Iraq War Emails

US-VOTE-CLINTON-CAMPAIGN-SOCIAL MEDIA-CONTENT-TOWN HALLUS-VOTE-CLINTON-CAMPAIGN-SOCIAL MEDIA-CONTENT-TOWN HALL
Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton addresses a town hall with about 100 millennials who are digital content creators and social media influencers, June 28, 2016, at Neuehouse in Hollywood, California.Photograph by Robyn Beck—AFP/Getty Images

It just got much easier to read Hillary Clinton’s emails.

On Monday, whistleblowing website WikiLeaks tweeted a link to 1,258 emails that it claims were sent and received by the former Secretary of State pertaining to the war in Iraq.

The emails were part of a trove of 30,322 emails made available by the U.S. State Department as a result of a Freedom of Information Act request, according to WikiLeaks.

While the emails were available since February of this year, the tweet was timed to Wednesday’s release of the so-called Chilcot report, which will outline the U.K.’s involvement in the Iraq war. According to the New York Times, the report “is likely to be the definitive assessment of a conflict that is widely seen in Britain as the worst foreign policy blunder since the 1956 Suez crisis.”

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The release also coincided with an announcement made Tuesday by FBI director James Comey FBI Director James Comey that “no reasonable prosecutor” would bring a criminal case against Hillary Clinton and that the organization found “no intentional misconduct.”

“Although there is evidence of potential violations, our judgment is that no reasonable prosecutor would bring such a case,” Comey said in a press statement.“We are expressing to [the] Justice [department] our view that no charges are appropriate in this case.”

The Justice department will now make the final decision as to whether to bring charges against Clinton for using a personal email server during her time as Secretary of State. Attorney General Loretta Lynch has said that she expects to follow the FBI’s recommendation.