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The Broadsheet: June 22nd

Good morning, Broadsheet readers! The First Lady is officially snapping, Victoria Beckham comes out against Brexit, and Hillary Clinton pulled no punches in her latest attack on Donald Trump. Have a productive Wednesday.

EVERYONE’S TALKING

• Clinton comes out swinging. Hillary Clinton seems to have hit her stride, yesterday delivering a speech that ruthlessly pummeled Donald Trump’s economic policies. She portrayed him as a bad businessman, a heartless boss, and an unqualified candidate—and managed to squeeze in a couple of digs about his take on working women. “He once called pregnant employees—and I quote—‘an inconvenience,’” she reminded the crowd.

Trump, meanwhile, met with Christian conservatives, attacked the sincerity of Clinton’s religious beliefs and vowed to appoint anti-abortion judges to the Supreme Court.

ALSO IN THE HEADLINES

• Snaps to FLOTUS. Are you a Snapchat holdout? It may be time to sign up: First Lady Michelle Obama, who already has proven herself a master of social media on Twitter, Vine, and Instagram, just launched her own account on the disappearing photo platform. Fortune

• Trollbusters. Ghostbusters stars Kristen Wiig, Melissa McCarthy, Leslie Jones, and Kate McKinnon talk about the bizarre, sexist backlash that’s sprung up around their upcoming film. Wiig’s diagnosis of the critics who’ve denounced the movie’s all-female casting? “They need to probably go to therapy.” New York Times

• Vassallo’s new venture. Trae Vassallo, the former Kleiner Perkins investor whose deals included Nest Labs and Dropcam, has quietly launched a new venture capital firm called Defy.vc.  Fortune

• Posh is in. Victoria Beckham and her husband David are the latest high profile Britons to come out against Brexit. The former Spice Girl stated her position on Instagram, after efforts by the “Leave” side to leverage her quote from a 1996 interview in which she criticized the then-new E.U. passports. Curious about what side other celebs are taking on the matter? Check out our quiz.

• A ghost in yoga pants? This fascinating story from TheStreet asks a seemingly bizarre question: Is longtime Lululemon board member Rhonda Pitcher a real person? Spoiler: Maybe not.  TheStreet

MOVERS AND SHAKERS: Beatrice “Bunny” Ellerin has been named director of the Healthcare and Pharmaceutical Management (HPM) Program at Columbia Business School.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

Sweet story. Christina Tosi, owner of Momofuku Milk Bar, the New York City bakery that made its name with cereal milk-flavored ice cream and “compost” cookies, talks about her first meeting with WD-50 chef Wylie Dufresne, who would ultimately become her mentor. Fortune

• Management problems. New research from workforce analytics firm Visier finds that the gender wage gap is very closely tied to the “management divide.” Starting at age 32, men vault into manager jobs at a much higher rate than do women, giving them a major earnings boost. WSJ

• A serious game. Fans of Christina Grimmie, the singer who was shot and killed on June 10, have created two online petitions to urge Nintendo to name a character in Zelda—a fantasy video game that the singer loved—after the 22-year-old. The company responded, saying that it “won’t be making any creative or content decisions in this time of mourning.”  Time

• Oprah’s ovation. Oprah Winfrey returned to the small screen last night in the debut of her new drama, Greenleaf. The initial critical buzz? Two thumbs up. Fortune

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ON MY RADAR

Why these businesswomen are voting for Trump  Fast Company

WNBA’s Brittney Griner was cyber-bullied on Father’s Day  Washington Post

Madeleine Albright: Turning refugees into enemies is self-defeating  Time

Judith Hill: I was on the plane with Prince  New York Times

QUOTE

Here’s my advice to you: Even if you have a job you love and have been there for 22 years, carry a reinvention plan in your back pocket.

Lesley Jane Seymour, the former editor of <em>More</em> and <em>Marie Claire.</em>