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The Broadsheet: April 8th

Good morning, Broadsheet readers! Elizabeth Banks has a new site for funny ladies, Dilma Rousseff loses by winning, and China’s “leftover women” bring me to tears. Have a relaxing weekend.

EVERYONE’S TALKING

• When winning is losing. The votes have been tallied and we have a… winner? Fortune‘s online poll named Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff the World’s Most Disappointing Leader. She beat out 18 other nominees, including Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer and Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes. Rousseff, who was expected to be a champion of the working class, has turned out to be a destructive force, allowing her country to be dragged into the muck of corruption. That said, she may not remain a “leader” of any type for long: Brazil is edging ever closer to an impeachment battle. Fortune

ALSO IN THE HEADLINES

• Bulking up the board. Speaking of Elizabeth Holmes: Theranos, her troubled blood-testing startup, announced that it has assembled what Fortune‘s Roger Parloff calls “a startlingly well-qualified medical advisory board.” Former president of the American Association For Clinical Chemistry Susan Evans and Ann Gronowski of the Washington University School of Medicine are among the members. Fortune

• Love the squid lid. As part of the U.S. military’s continuing push to become more gender-neutral, the Navy is giving those iconic white sailor hats to female recruits for the first time. There are at least a dozen delightful details in this story, including that the hats are known as “Dixie cups,” “squid lids,” and “dog dishes.” In related news, the Marine Corps says its next ad campaign will show more women in the fleet and at war.

• Banking on women. Actress and director Elizabeth Banks has launched Whohaha.com, a site dedicated to content from funny women like Jennifer Lawrence, Julianne Moore, and Hannah Hart, creator of YouTube sensation, My Drunk Kitchen. AdAge

• There’s something in my eye. This documentary-style ad from skincare brand SK-II aims to empower China’s so-called “leftover women”—those who remain single past their mid-20s. It’s a shockingly touching video (it brought me to tears at my desk!) and I strongly encourage you to watch. Fortune

• Reading the tea leaves on leave. Three New York Times reporters talk about the latest state and corporate moves around paid family leave, and debate what they may portend for the future. New York Times

MOVERS AND SHAKERS: Marvell Technology Group fired president Weili Dai and her husband, CEO Sehat Sutardja, after an internal investigation uncovered accounting issues. Dai will remain on the company’s board.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

• Asia’s power players. Forbes‘ annual list of Asia’s 50 powerful businesswomen includes a whopping 27 newcomers this year, including Nita Ambani, a non-executive director of Reliance Industries Ltd, India’s most valuable company. Forbes

• Meet the squeaky wheel. Esther George, president of the Kansas City Fed, talks about why she recently cast the sole vote in favor of raising interest rates. New York Times

 • From Rey to Jyn. The release of a teaser trailer for Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, the highly anticipated Star Wars spinoff, reveals that, like The Force Awakens, this film’s plot revolves around a woman: Felicity Jones plays Rebel fighter Jyn Erso. Time

• Student superstars. Check out the impressive young women profiled in Glamour‘s 2016 College Women of the Year package. Glamour

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Correction: Yesterday, I mistakenly referred to The Hollywood Reporter’s list of the 35 most powerful people in New York media as belonging to The New Republic. Apologies.

ON MY RADAR

Why Kesha’s court case matters to all women  Time

How Boko Haram trains abducted women and girls to be suicide bombers  New York Times

OJ Simpson prosecutor Marcia Clark on her unexpected redemption  Broadly

How to appeal to dude investors? Tell them your product is for men  New York Magazine

QUOTE

I’m on the crusade to find a dynamic, female character, whether she’s likable or not. Likable puts women in a very small box.

Reese Witherspoon on what she and partner Bruna Papandrea look for in projects for their production company, Pacific Standard