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Korean Air ‘nut rage’ princess could face jail

January 7, 2015

<> on December 17, 2014 in Seoul, South Korea. Former Korean Air Lines Co. Vice President Cho Hyun-ah will be questioned by Prosecutors' Office for suspicions of violating the aviation safety law in the incident when Cho allegedly ordered the chief purser of a Korean Air Airbus A 380 jet traveling from New York to Incheon to leave the plane over how nuts were served, causing the jet with 250 passengers to arrive 11 minute late in Incheon.<> on December 17, 2014 in Seoul, South Korea. Former Korean Air Lines Co. Vice President Cho Hyun-ah will be questioned by Prosecutors' Office for suspicions of violating the aviation safety law in the incident when Cho allegedly ordered the chief purser of a Korean Air Airbus A 380 jet traveling from New York to Incheon to leave the plane over how nuts were served, causing the jet with 250 passengers to arrive 11 minute late in Incheon.
Cho Hyun-Ah's new-found humility hasn't saved her from charges of violating air safety rules. Photograph by Chung Sung-Jun — Getty Images

This article is published in cooperation with Time.com. The original version can be found here.

By Elizabeth Barber @ElizabethKateri

South Korean prosecutors filed charges against the daughter of the chairman of Korean Air Lines on Wednesday for delaying a flight — and, prosecutors allege, endangering its safety — because she was unhappy about how she was served nuts.

Police have held Heather Cho Hyun-ah, formerly head of in-flight service at her father’s airline, in custody since Dec. 30, after she threw a tantrum when a flight attendant gave her macadamia nuts in a bag, not on a dish. Dubbing the fiasco the “nut rage” incident, media have struggled to decide if it should inspire disgust over the entitlement of South Korea’s ultra-rich or a chuckle at their expense.

Yet the charges against Cho, who has resigned from her posts at the South Korean airline, are anything but chuckle-worthy. They include violations of aviation safety regulations for allegedly disrupting the South Korea-bound plane’s flight plan by forcing it to return to New York’s John F. Kennedy airport shortly after leaving the gate. The Financial Times reports that Cho, if convicted, could face up to 15 years in prison.