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Ones to watch: These executives could be the next to land on the Most Powerful Women list

October 19, 2020, 9:30 AM UTC

Placing bets on which executives will land on the Most Powerful Women list in coming years? These are the names to put your money on:

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Courtesy of Honeywell

Que Dallara

President and CEO, Connected Enterprise, Honeywell

Spearheading the industrial giant’s migration from smokestacks to software stacks.

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Courtesy of Google

Halimah DeLaine Prado

General Counsel, Google

The new top lawyer takes the job at a key moment, amid antitrust claims and employee complaints.

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Gonzalo Marroquin—Patrick McMullan/Getty Images

Susan Huang

Cohead, Investment Banking, Morgan Stanley

Huang, often mentioned as a CEO contender, is one of the first women to run a Wall Street i-banking business. 

MPW-2020-OTW-Pearlena Igbokwe
Phillip Farrone—WireImage/Getty Images

Pearlena Igbokwe

Chairman, Universal Studio Group, NBCUniversal

Igbokwe was promoted last month to fill the shoes of industry player Bonnie Hammer.

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Rachel Murray—Getty Images

Meredith Kopit Levien

CEO, New York Times

At 49, the youngest CEO in the Gray Lady’s 169-year history is steering the paper through a critical period for media.

Courtesy of the Clorox Corporation

Linda Rendle

CEO, Clorox

The 42-year-old took the helm in September, guiding Clorox through an unprecedented surge in COVID-driven demand.

Rodin Eckenroth—Getty Images

Ann Sarnoff

Chair and CEO, WarnerMedia Studios and Networks Group

She now runs the vast majority of content at AT&T’s entertainment giant.

Marc F. Henning—Courtesy of Walmart

Latriece Watkins 

EVP, Consumables, Walmart U.S., Walmart

Oversees key pandemic categories like household chemicals and paper goods.

Paul Morigi—Getty Images

Toni Townes-Whitley

President, U.S. Regulated Industries, Microsoft

Expanding the tech company’s cloud business to sectors like education and health care.

A version of this article appears in the November 2020 issue of Fortune.