By Don Reisinger
May 3, 2018

Apple Watch is being credited for saving a New York man’s life.

While he was working at his family’s bowling alley business Bowlerland last month, 32-year-old William Monzidelis became dizzy and started bleeding all over his body. Soon after, the Apple Watch he was wearing sent him a notification to immediately seek medical help.

On the way to the hospital, Monzidelis started to have seizures and by the time he arrived at the hospital just 30 minutes later, he had lost 80% of his blood, according to NBC New York, which earlier reported on the harrowing story. Emergency personnel discovered he had suffered an erupted ulcer and would need a blood transfusion just to have surgery to correct it. Doctors performed the surgery and he survived.

According to Monzidelis, who was interviewed by NBC New York, the doctors told him that if he didn’t receive the Apple Watch notification, he would’ve died.

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Although the Apple Watch isn’t classified as a dedicated medical device, it has an increasing number of features aimed at monitoring a person’s health. Chief among its health-focused features is a tracker that will monitor a person’s heart activity and alert them when something is off. When Apple Watch identifies a problem, it sends an urgent notification that tells people to seek medical attention.

Monzidelis’ story isn’t unique. Earlier this week, in fact, ABC News reported that the Apple Watch saved the life of an 18-year-old woman after it recognized that her resting heart rate had jumped to 160 beats per minute. She rushed to an urgent care and then an emergency room, where she was told she had kidney failure, according to the report. If not for the Apple Watch, she would have died, doctors apparently told her.

“Stories like Deanna’s inspire us to dream bigger and push harder every day,” Apple CEO Tim Cook tweeted this week in response to the ABC News article.

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