A major Hillary Clinton supporter who once called president-elect Donald Trump a “racist bully” and a “pathetic coward” is now calling for a truce with the businessman.

“It’s no secret that I didn’t want to see Donald Trump win yesterday,” Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass) said in a statement Wednesday. “But the integrity of our democracy is more important than any individual election, and those of us who supported Hillary Clinton will respect this result. President-elect Trump promised to rebuild our economy for working people, and I offer to put aside our differences and work with him on that task.”

Warren, who has spoken at Clinton’s rallies on the campaign trail, has exchanged bitter words with Trump on stage and on Twitter. While Warren has labelled him a “thin-skinned bully,” Trump has called her “sad to watch” and nicknamed the Senator “Pocahontas” over her claims of Cherokee heritage. And that’s only a few of the insults the two have traded.

Warren has also stoked fires surrounding claims that Trump is a misogynist.

 

As recently as Monday, Trump called Warren a “terrible person,” ”a terrible human being” and a “terrible senator,” According to the Associated Press.

 

Warren’s full statement, as posted on her Facebook page, is below:

It’s no secret that I didn’t want to see Donald Trump win yesterday. I’m intensely frustrated by the apparent likelihood that, for the second time in five elections, a Democratic nominee will have won the popular vote but lost the presidency in the electoral college. But the integrity of our democracy is more important than any individual election, and those of us who supported Hillary Clinton will respect this result.

President-Elect Trump promised to rebuild our economy for working people, and I offer to put aside our differences and work with him on that task. When he takes the oath of office as the leader of our democracy and the leader of all Americans, it is my sincere hope that he will fulfill that role with respect and concern for every single person in this country, no matter who they are, where they come from, what they believe, or whom they love.

Warren’s message of unity echoes those of other Democratic leaders after the results of the presidential elections last night.

Clinton in her concession speech Wednesday morning called for her supporters to give Trump an “open mind and a chance to lead.” On the same day, President Barack Obama addressed the public, saying “we are all rooting for his success in uniting and leading the country.”

Similarly, following a brutal and divisive campaign that lasted over a year, Trump gave a far more calming speech that called for the nation to come together after his win.

“To all Republicans and Democrats and independents across this nation, I say it is time for us to come together as one united people,” he said.

Additional reporting by the Associated Press.