Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.
Courtesy: Facebook
By Tom Huddleston Jr.
March 25, 2015

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg kicked off the social networking giant’s annual F8 developer conference in San Francisco Wednesday with a keynote address that included a string of numbers touting the size of Facebook’s network of developers.

Speaking to a crowd of mobile app developers, Zuckerberg spouted off the following stats:

—Facebook (FB) drove more than 3.5 billion app installations in 2014.

—The social network’s users shared 50 billion pieces of content from apps last year.

—Facebook has paid more than $8 billion to developers over the past five years.

—More than 30 million apps and websites use Facebook’s developer tools.

—More than 80% of the country’s top 100 grossing iOS and Android apps let users log in through Facebook.

Zuckerberg also noted that Facebook has worked diligently to monitor the permissions process to ensure that developers aren’t asking for more permissions than necessary when users log in through Facebook. Zuckerberg said that monitoring has resulted in higher log in rates and a 50% decrease in permission requests.

The Facebook cofounder also broke down the size of the user bases for what Zuckerberg called Facebook’s “family of apps.” That includes 1.4 billion users for the core Facebook app, as well as 700 million users each for both Groups and WhatsApp. Facebook’s photo-sharing app, Instagram, has 300 million users each month and the dedicated messaging platform Messenger has 600 million users.

Facebook used the rest of the keynote address to reveal its new Messenger platform, which will support third-party apps, while also announcing that Facebook videos are now embeddable on other websites. The company also said app-building platform Parse will expand to work with the so-called Internet of things.

The F8 conference will continue through Thursday.

More coverage of this year’s F8 conference:

Facebook debuts Messenger Platform, will support third-party apps

Facebook will support ‘spherical videos’ in News Feed

With embedded videos, Facebook takes aim at YouTube

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