By Don Reisinger
October 16, 2017

Facebook is planning to fight possible election rigging with help from people with national security clearances, according to a new report.

The world’s largest social network is planning to hire people with national security clearances to prevent foreign governments from using its service to impact elections, Bloomberg is reporting, citing people who claim to have knowledge of its plans. Employees with national security clearances can access classified U.S. government information. Facebook would need to petition the U.S. for the employee to receive the information because clearances are deactivated after a person leaves the government’s employ, according to the report.

Facebook has been at the epicenter of a controversy that suggests Russians used social media services, including its own, to strategically impact public opinion and sway the electorate towards President Donald Trump in the 2016 election. Facebook has acknowledged that its service was used by Russians and said last month that the Russian government bought $100,000 in ads during the election.

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For its part, Facebook (FB) has said that it will hire people to address the security of its service to prevent the possibility of governments targeting its users. Facebook also plans to collaborate with governments wherever possible to improve election integrity.

According to the Bloomberg report, Facebook believes hiring workers with security clearances can be integral to that effort. In its dealings with governments and intelligence agencies, Facebook could utilize those with security clearance to talk through problems and have greater insight into efforts aimed at impacting elections, according to the report.

It’s unclear from the report whether Facebook has already hired employees with security clearances and how many it wants to hire. The company could reveal some details about its plan on November 1, when it’s expected to testify before Congress on Russia’s activities during the election.

Facebook did not immediately respond to a Fortune request for comment on the Bloomberg report.

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