A digital repository for critical health data.

By Don Reisinger
June 15, 2017
June 15, 2017

Apple might have some grand health-related ambitions for its iPhone.

The tech giant has formed a team to develop a technology that would allow the iPhone to house a person’s health records, including lab results, allergy information, and clinical findings, CNBC is reporting, citing people who claim to have knowledge of the plans. The data stored to the iPhone could then be shared with hospitals and other healthcare providers, ostensibly to make it easier for doctors to treat patients.

Apple is holding discussions with hospitals and healthcare industry professionals, and the team is eyeing possible acquisitions to more quickly ramp up the offering, the report says.

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Apple AAPL is among several prominent technology companies, including Alphabet, that are working on healthcare-related technologies. Apple, for instance, already offers a Health app in its mobile operating system iOS that allows users to track basic information like weight, calories, and exercise. The service also lets users input personal information, like blood type and allergies, for use by medical professionals in an emergency.

According to CNBC, Apple wants to expand that to include more information that healthcare providers could use to treat patients. The iPhone maker reportedly believes the service would facilitate the digital transfer of critical health information—something the healthcare industry is currently struggling to do.

Still, it’s unclear from the report whether the service will ever find its way to the iPhone, and if it did, when it might be available.

Apple did not respond to a Fortune request for comment on the CNBC report.

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