Elissa Murphy, CTO, GoDaddy
By Jonathan Vanian
April 15, 2016

GoDaddy’s head technology guru is leaving the building and going to Google.

The website hosting company revealed in a regulatory filing on Friday that its chief technology officer and executive vice president of its cloud computing business group, Elissa Murphy, has resigned. Her April 12 resignation will be effective on May 17, the filing states.

In a statement to Fortune, GoDaddy CEO Blake Irving said, “Murphy has significantly advanced GoDaddy’s technology vision and capabilities.”

“She has been instrumental in the evolution of the company, and while we will miss her greatly, we wish her the very best as she takes on a new and exciting challenge at Google,” wrote Irving.

Irving wrote that the GoDaddy’s chief information and infrastructure officer Arne Josefsberg will take over Murphy’s position. GoDaddy did not say what Murphy will be doing at Google. Fortune has contacted Google for more information.

The move is noteworthy considering GoDaddy (gddy) recently unveiled a possible competitor to several popular cloud computing businesses, like Amazon, Google (goog), and Microsoft. These companies typically sell computing resources from their data centers on-demand to customers so companies don’t have to buy their own data center hardware.

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Unlike Amazon (amzn) or Microsoft, GoDaddy was marketing its new cloud-computing unit to small businesses as opposed to giant companies like Pfizer (pfe) and Nokia.

In July 2014, Fortune profiled Murphy as part of a question and answer series in which she explained her lengthy technology career and the challenges GoDaddy faces in helping its small business clients run their companies better using the data it collects for them. Murphy has held management positions at many big technology companies including Yahoo (yhoo), Microsoft (msft), and Symantec (symc).

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In March, Fortune profiled GoDaddy founder Bob Parsons and his new business selling high-end golf clubs.

Google has been busy building its cloud computing business unit and in November hired VMware (vmw) founder Diane Greene to head the division.

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