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MatthewSalzberg
Matthew Salzberg, CEO and founder of Blue Apron
Commentary

How to successfully change careers (at any age)

Mar 31, 2015

The Leadership Insider network is an online community where the most thoughtful and influential people in business contribute answers to timely questions about careers and leadership. Today’s answer to the question "What's your best piece of advice for someone looking to change careers?" is by Matthew Salzberg, CEO and founder of Blue Apron.

Changing careers is one of the most challenging professional risks you can take . You’ll be competing for a job with others who already have the experience that you lack, and many employers, particularly those in high growth industries or venture-backed companies (the world I come from) have limited patience for employees who can’t hit the ground running. I’ve made a few career transitions over the course of my life -- from private equity investor to venture capitalist and ultimately becoming an entrepreneur, as co-founder and CEO at Blue Apron. Here are a few tips I’ve found helpful along the way:

Do it at the right time
Changing careers or starting a company is a stressful experience. Your professional life will be chaos. Your future role will be uncertain and so will your compensation. Who knows if you will even be good at what you’ve set out to do? And I’ve always believed that you can only have chaos in one sphere of your life at a time. So, if you're thinking about a professional transition, try to do it during a time when your personal life is stable. Making a career change right as you're about to have your first child, breakup from a serious relationship, or move to a different city can make the transition even tougher . When I started Blue Apron, I was based in New York City, had a strong network of friends and family, and I was in a long-term committed relationship. This secure environment gave me the confidence to take the professional risk I needed to successfully start a business.

Seek out experts and mentors
When you change careers you’ll have a lot to learn – and quickly. The best way to ease this transition is to seek out people who can advise and coach you along the way with perspectives that are different than your own . One of the reasons I went into venture capital before starting a company was because I wanted to build a network of other CEOs and start-up experts who I could lean on for different perspectives and advice when necessary . Similarly, when starting Blue Apron, I deliberately sought to work with people who had come from different backgrounds and could bring another level of expertise to the table. As a result, my co-founding team members all had skills that complemented one another , which have played an important role in the success of Blue Apron .

Be humble
When you’re making a career transition, you should focus on what really matters—how to set yourself up for long-term success. In most cases this means getting your foot in the door, so you can be in a position where you can learn and grow. However, I’ve seen too many people coming from success in a different industry fixate on getting the perfect role, compensation, or an important title. If you can find a position at a great company, or with a great boss who will help you grow -- ultimately position ing yourself for future success -- jump at it and don’t sweat the details. When I left private equity, I took a pay cut to get the experience I needed in venture capital -- and I’m glad I did. The experience I got was critical to successfully starting a company, which was a long-standing career goal for me.

Before starting Blue Apron I had no previous CEO experience, and it hasn’t been easy growing the company to over 1,200 employees in just two and a half years. We deliver recipes and ingredients for millions of meals across the country, and making that happen at scale requires us to reinvent the way things are done every day. The ability to embrace new challenges has been critical not only for myself, but also for business.

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