6 ugliest Apple products

Updated: Jun 11, 2014 6:16 PM UTC | Originally published: Oct 29, 2012

JLPGA PowerBook 170 (1992)<\/h1>\nMore the product of a questionable color scheme than poor industrial design, this commemorative Mac is extremely rare. Some 500 were made in honor of the JLPGA golf tournament in Japan.

JLPGA PowerBook 170 (1992)

More the product of a questionable color scheme than poor industrial design, this commemorative Mac is extremely rare. Some 500 were made in honor of the JLPGA golf tournament in Japan.

Power Macintosh G3 All-in-One (1998)<\/h1>\nDoomed to a short existence thanks to the iMac, which came on the scene shortly after, the Power Mac G3 all-in-one was an ungainly incarnation of the idea that would eventually mark the beginning of Apple's resurgence. Another saving grace of the questionable design? It was sold only to educational buyers, not consumers.

Power Macintosh G3 All-in-One (1998)

Doomed to a short existence thanks to the iMac, which came on the scene shortly after, the Power Mac G3 all-in-one was an ungainly incarnation of the idea that would eventually mark the beginning of Apple's resurgence. Another saving grace of the questionable design? It was sold only to educational buyers, not consumers.

Flower Power iMac (2001)<\/h1>\nWhat happens when you run out of clever colors for your incredibly popular line of desktop computers? Apple found out in early 2001. Its multicolor iMacs -- like this one dubbed Flower Power -- had designs molded into their plastic casing.\n\n

Flower Power iMac (2001)

What happens when you run out of clever colors for your incredibly popular line of desktop computers? Apple found out in early 2001. Its multicolor iMacs -- like this one dubbed Flower Power -- had designs molded into their plastic casing.

eMate 300 (1997)<\/h1>\nAimed at the education market as a low-cost laptop running the maligned Newton operating system, the eMate sported the plastic aesthetic perfected in the iMac. The short-lived $800 device was cancelled a year later.Photograph by Colin Harris\/Flickr\/CC

eMate 300 (1997)

Aimed at the education market as a low-cost laptop running the maligned Newton operating system, the eMate sported the plastic aesthetic perfected in the iMac. The short-lived $800 device was cancelled a year later.

Apple III (1980)<\/h1>\nMore a failure of internal, rather than external, design, the Apple III was an early failure for the company. A high-end version of the popular Apple II aimed at business, it suffered from multiple defects.Photo: SSPL\/Getty Images

Apple III (1980)

More a failure of internal, rather than external, design, the Apple III was an early failure for the company. A high-end version of the popular Apple II aimed at business, it suffered from multiple defects.

Macintosh Portable (1989)<\/h1>\nThe first battery-powered portable Mac was anything but svelte. Still, that didn't stop the model from being the first commercial portable computer used to send an email from space in 1991. Photo: SSPL\/Getty Images

Macintosh Portable (1989)

The first battery-powered portable Mac was anything but svelte. Still, that didn't stop the model from being the first commercial portable computer used to send an email from space in 1991.