By Laura Stampler
November 13, 2018

Want to shill yoga pants on Instagram like your favorite Kardashian but only have 1/100,000 of her reach? According to a new report from the New York Times, you might be in luck.

Business reporter Sapna Maheshwari writes that brands are now reaching out to nanoinfluencers, a term “used by companies to describe people who have as few as 1,000 followers and are willing to advertise products on social media”, to proliferate their social stream with #ads.

According to the Association of National Advertisers, as many as 75 percent of national advertisers currently partake in influencer marketing and 43 percent of those companies are planning to expand their influencer budget in the next year.

And nanoinfluencers don’t come with a Kardashian price tag.

While WWD reports that Kylie Kardashian yields $1 million per Instagram post to her 119 million followers, and Digiday estimates that microinfluencers charge approximately $1,000 per 100,000 followers, Maheshwari writes, “For most nanoinfluencers, money isn’t part of the deal. Free products are viewed as fair compensation for the ads they post outside their day jobs.”

Although many nanoinfluencers aren’t old enough for day jobs.

Last February, skincare brand Clean & Clear reached out to teens with under 500 followers to post about its product. As Simon Geraghty, U.S. acne portfolio lead for Johnson & Johnson, told Ad Age, the brand was “trying influencers who weren’t famous per se but [are] doing things that other kids responded to authentically, letting them tell their story and building the products and brands from there.”

And authenticity is everything.

Principal analyst at Altimeter Group Brian Solis told PR News Online that 70 percent of consumers say that they’re influenced by friends and family members online, while only 32 percent claimed to be influenced technical “influencers.”

So get ready for a lot more #sponcon on your feed.

SPONSORED FINANCIAL CONTENT

You May Like

EDIT POST