By Kirsten Korosec
August 3, 2017

Tesla’s flagship sedan, the Model S, is used to being on top. It’s the top-ranked ultra luxury vehicle according to Consumer Reports and once landed Motor Trend’s Car of the Year, beating out all of those gas-powered vehicles.

But now the Chevrolet Bolt, GM’s all-electric car that starts at $37,495 including the destination fee, has beat a Model S 75D in a battery range test conducted by Consumer Reports.

The rating agency—which has rocky relationship with Tesla that swing from wildly in love to disappointment—pitted the Chevy Bolt against a 2016 Tesla Model S 75D.

The Tesla Model S 75D, which has an estimated EPA range of 259 miles, ran out of charge at 235 miles. The Chevy Bolt, which has an EPA range of 238, traveled another 15 miles to hit 250 miles before running out of charge, CR said in a report issued Thursday.

Most of the test was conducted on a highway, driving a constant 65 miles per hour without running the air conditioning or heating.

Tesla does have other versions of the Model S that are equipped with a more robust battery. However, all of these versions are a lot more expensive than the Chevy Bolt. As Consumer Reports notes, you could buy two Chevy Bolts for the price of one Model S 75D.

A new Model S 75D starts at $75,700, including destination and documentation fees. The Model S 100D, which has an EPA estimated range of 335 miles, starts at $98,700. Of course, all of these vehicles, Chevy Bolt included, are eligible for the $7,500 federal tax credit.

This range test hasn’t affected the Model S’s standing with Consumer Reports. The Model S is still the No. 1 all-electric vehicles in its ranking, followed by the Chevy Bolt. The Bolt received positive marks for range, agility, and a quiet cabin, CR said. It lost points for an “overly squishy brake-pedal feel, long charging time, choppy ride, and uncomfortable seats,” according to the agency.

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