Datadog—the New York startup that monitors how well (or not so well) its customers’ applications run in the cloud—now has $94.5 million in new funding, bringing its total to a healthy $147.9 million.

The company will use the money to flesh out its product line and beef up global operations in Europe, Asia and the Americas.

One big goal will be to add more data sources—there are about 120 now—and come up with new ways to monitor applications. The rationale is to help businesses wring the most out of both their legacy and newer cloud applications, Olivier Pomel, Datadog chief executive said in a statement.

MORE: Proof that we live in a multi-cloud world.

Datadog competes with New Relic newr , AppDynamics as well as offerings from older companies like BMC. The company’s new funds come one year after a $31 million C round, and was led by Iconiq Capital with contributions from existing backers Index Ventures, OpenView Ventures, Amplify Partners, and Contour Ventures.

WATCH: More on cloud computing.

There’s been a bit of a groundswell in funding for startups focused on keeping cloud applications humming of late. Scalr just announced a $7.35 million in funding. In December, Cloudyn closed on an $11 million round in in December, and Server Density, which has been boot-strapped to date, announced $1.5 million in seed funding. Google goog bought Stackdriver, another player in performance monitoring in 2014, for an undisclosed amount.

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Datadog claims some big-name customers including Airbnb, Netflix nflx , Spotify, Warner Brothers Games.

The idea behind is to give businesses, many of which now rely on a variety of outside “Software-as-a-Service” applications and infrastructure from Amazon amzn Web Services, Microsoft msft , crm , Github, and dozens of other providers.

Server Density andStackdriver (which was purchased by Google last year).