For many colleges, the days of cramming four freshmen in one dorm room with a communal bathroom down the hall are gone, as campus housing is stepping up to meet the changing demands of the next generation of college students. But since not every college can splurge on luxury living for its incoming freshman class, a handful of companies are stepping in to meet that gap with luxury off-campus housing, where the residences look like something out of Dwell magazine. The list of amenities can be drool-inducing for even parents, as the apartments come with rooftop pools, volleyball courts, spas and the requisite granite counter tops and stainless steel appliances.

Marc Lifshin, a managing partner at Core Spaces, which develops and runs luxury student housing across the U.S., says that that the type of amenities students are looking for changes every year and vary by market, as well as climate. “Some of our properties have volley ball courts and rooftop infinity pools while in other places, walk-in closets are a huge bonus.” But while this may sound like Club Med rather than college, the buildings are also geared towards studying with private study rooms and dedicated quiet floors.

Lifshin says that the high-end design appeals to students and their parents, who are often footing the bill. “Parents love what they see when they walk in,” he says.

Core Spaces apartments come fully furnished with sleek and modern designs. At the soon to open Hub On Campus Madison in Wisconsin, the property will have a volleyball court, jumbotron, a spa and tanning room. Rates will start at $500 a bed but for students looking to live large, the most luxurious option is The Sapphire 26 VIP, a 3-bedroom, 3-bath unit that rents for $4,760 a month. Students living here will have private access to the VIP-only 12th floor, a private in-unit hot tub, and a wrap-around balcony overlooking State Street and the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. Other bonuses include a 55” Samsung Smart TV with a built-in Klipsch speakers, an Altir body spray shower column, a glass-front mini-fridge at the dry bar area, as well as a side-by-side washer and dryer.

And since these are being rented to students, does Lifshin worry about the residences getting trashed?

“You have to be very careful with the kind of fabric that you choose,” he says.

Here’s a look at some of the companies that have gotten into the business of pampering college students across the U.S.