By John Kell and Alan Murray
May 28, 2015

Internet Guru Mary Meeker released her annual “Internet Trends” presentation yesterday.

 

It weighs in at 197 slides (whatever happened to the 10-slide rule?) and I can’t pretend to have digested it all. But I would recommend the section beginning on slide 29, which opens with a quote (actually, a tweet) from Box CEO Aaron Levie saying “enterprise software used to be about making work more efficient. Now the opportunity is for software to transform the work itself.”

 

 

Meeker highlights a dozen mobile apps that have the potential to change the way executives work by, among other things, bringing critical data insights to their fingertips. She quotes DataStax CEO Billy Bosworth: “Ten years from now, when we look back at how this era of big data evolved…we will be stunned at how uniformed we used to be when we made decisions.” I think he’s right, although it may take more than ten years to make sense of the current data chaos that engulfs most businesses.

 

Meanwhile, closer to home, the report shows why even worse times lie ahead for print media.

 

Enjoy the day.

 

 

 

 

 

Alan Murray
@alansmurray
alan.murray@fortune.com

Top News

• Broadcom takeover looks likely

“It’s really economically difficult to be a small semiconductor,” said Broadcom CEO Scott McGregor earlier this year. “The larger companies are going to look for consolidation.” That may explain why WSJ has reported chip maker Avago Technologies is in advanced talks to buy Broadcom in a deal worth about $35 billion. The news led Fortune to wonder what will happen to Marvell, another smaller silicon industry rival. WSJ (subscription required)

• Apple vs. Google in connected cars

A battle over the connected car has been brewing between Apple and Google for a few years now. This week, the rivalry intensified. GM’s Chevrolet and Hyundai each announced planes to add technologies that will deliver smartphone functionality to the dashboard of new cars. Chevrolet said it would offer both Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility, while Hyundai’s 2015 Sonata became the first car to include Google’s new in-car voice-enabled software.  Fortune

• Rocky ride batters star managers

Some big names in the investment world have been caught off guard by the recent rise in global yields and the strength in the euro against the dollar, with some saying the market is more volatile. Pimco’s flagship Total Return Fund, for example, lost its crown as the biggest bond fund in the world recently. And bond veterans Dan Fuss of Loomis Sayles and Bill Gross of Janus Capital have also run into a few problems by their fixed-income and currency trades.  Reuters

• What’s next for GoPro

GoPro is known for giving extreme sports enthusiasts a way to share their experiences with friends: hook a camera to their helmets, boards, and bodies. CEO Nick Woodman unveiled the company’s new product: a camera system for snapping images that can be turned into virtual reality. GoPro is also working on a drone, which is slated to come out next year.  Fortune

• Jawbone sues Fitbit

Fitness tracking device makers Jawbone and Fitbit aren’t just fighting for the right to be worn on consumers’ wrists: they are also in a court spat. While Fitbit is busy prepping for a market debut, the company’s biggest rival in the wearable health-tracking industry has filed a lawsuit against it, alleging Fitbit has “systematically” plundered confidential information by luring employees who brought along sensitive materials.  Fortune


Around the Water Cooler

• How entrepreneurs raise their kids

The New York Times chatted with a few entrepreneurs to learn more about how they are raising their children and came up with some not-so-surprising news: their children are interested in business and in some cases, being groomed to be CEOs of start ups at pretty young ages. “I was probably 5 to 7 years old when I knew the meaning of the word entrepreneur,” said one teen. “I’d say, ‘My parents are entrepreneurs. That means they make their own business.'”  New York Times (subscription required)

• Will Ellen Pao file an appeal?

Ellen Pao, the interim CEO of Reddit and former partner at venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, could be in the headlines again very soon. She has two weeks to decide whether or not to appeal the outcome of a gender discrimination suit she filed against her former employer. She spoke at the Code Conference but declined to reveal her decision, saying only that she is evaluating the options with her legal team.  Fortune

• Gucci discounts in China prompt lines

Luxury fashion house Gucci is offering discounts of as much as 50% in China as the company clears out merchandise designed by its former creative director. The company is accelerating an effort to reposition the maker of logo-adorned handbags and pricy loafers amid falling demand in Asia. Earlier this year, the company named a new creative director, whose first collection will hit stores later this year. Bloomberg

• Chewing gum wades into China

The habit of chewing gum may be permanently disappearing in many developed markets, just as it is angling for growth in emerging ones. Trident will soon be on sale in China, as Mondelez looks for growth as the company’s gum results have weakened in France, the U.S., and Japan. Why is gum out of favor? Well, breath mints have become more popular and some millennials think chewing gum is a little tacky.  Quartz

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