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Broad Strokes for October 7, 2016: Trump's 'Apprentice' Years & Kim Kardashian's Robbery

October 07, 2016 00:00 AM UTC
- Updated May 12, 2020 16:26 PM UTC

Why is violence against women so easy to joke about when it comes to celebrities? We dive in on this week's episode.

Transcript
[MUSIC PLAYING] Welcome to Broad Strokes. We have a lot to talk about this week. Obviously we have to start with what's becoming our weekly segment on Donald Trump. Yes, this is true. So this week, there is a new report out from the AP, who talked to about 40 people that worked with Trump on The Apprentice. And some of these people told really disturbing stories of sexist behavior from Trump on set. He was making a lot of comments about women's looks, their bodies, and specifically who he wanted to have sex with or not have sex with. Honestly, when this story first came out, it kind of fell flat for me and I think for a lot of other people. Like, I didn't really see that many people talking about it, tweeting about it. Yeah, I think you're right. And that actually drives me crazy. Imagine if this story had come out about the CEO of a Fortune 500 company or another politician, it's all we would be talking about. But there's just something about how people have just accepted this about Trump. I mean, we'll see, I guess, in November. I think it's going to be a little bit of a referendum on whether or not this kind of stuff is really acceptable in our country. Last Friday, The Wall Street Journal published an editorial by a venture capitalist named John Greathouse. And Greathouse's point was, look, there's so much unconscious bias in venture capital and in tech, why don't women just hide their gender? Why don't they use use their initials? You know, why don't they pretend to be men? This got a lot of negative reactions from women in venture capital who basically were like, you know, this is not a solution. We shouldn't have to hide our genders. This is kind of promoting the status quo. And Greathouse, to his credit, then apologized. Said, you know, I'm totally sorry. Didn't know what I was talking about. My bad. This is basically like mansplaining at its finest. This is a male VC coming in and saying, OK, women, here's your problem. I'm going to fix it. From a larger perspective, this is basically the opposite of what we need to happen. We want more women out there, setting an example, being more public, letting people know this is totally normal for women to work and succeed in tech and VC. I think the idea that hiding is a solution is completely off base. Earlier this week, the news broke that Kim Kardashian had been robbed in Paris. And it wasn't just that she was robbed. This was basically a violent assault. People broke into her hotel room. They held her at gunpoint. It sounded really scary and traumatizing. And I also thought the reaction online was really scary. You had people saying she deserved it and some really dark comments about the fact that she should have been sexually assaulted. This point about it being deserved and funny, it kind of reminds me of what happened when Gigi Hadid, the other week, where she was basically grabbed from behind by a prankster and she elbowed this guy in the face. And then people came out saying this wasn't model behavior, that she's a spoiled model. That really kind of got to me, because you're kind of saying, OK, this is a woman who actually fought back, fought back and defended herself, and then people are criticizing her for it. Yeah, I mean, we've talked a lot on this show before about trolling and online harassment, and that's definitely at play here. But for me, the major point is that we have a real problem with violence against women in our culture. And this is really playing into that, I think. So Kim Kardashian is assaulted, people are making fun of her, what does this say to regular women? If this is how people respond to something bad happened to Kim Kardashian, how seriously would they take someone like you or I? We hate to end the show on such a dark note, but that's all the time we have this week for Broad Strokes. Please come back next Friday for another episode on fortune.com. [MUSIC PLAYING]