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Building a STEM workforce that can keep the digital revolution alive and growing.

Intel’s success has long relied on its ability to keep up with Moore’s Law—a.k.a doubling the number of transistors on a chip (and thus, its computing power) roughly every two years. Its ability to hire talent with the right high-tech skills has arguably been no less important. To combat the shortage of employees with backgrounds in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), Intel has invested in several projects. Its largest is Intel Teach, a program that helps K-12 teachers integrate technology into classrooms and teach critical STEM skills to students. To date, the company has trained more than 15 million teachers worldwide via the program. The goal isn’t just to increase the global pipeline of students with STEM skills—it’s to ensure Intel itself has a growing pool of job candidates to pick from.

Company Information

Impact Segment
Education/Discovery
Sector
Technology
Industry
Semiconductors
CEO
Brian M. Krzanich
Websitehttp://www.intel.com
Employees107,300
Company Type
Public
Revenues ($M) (Last Fiscal Year)$55,355
Profits ($M) (Last Fiscal Year)$11,420
Market Value ($M)$163,361