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<h1>Dolf van den Brink</h1>
<strong>President and CEO, Heineken U.S.</strong>

Call him the ultimate company man. The lanky Dutchman's first job with Heineken was as a commercial management trainee back in 1998, for which he spent six months as a "unit controller" in Helmond, Netherlands. He rose methodically, and by the time he left the Congo in 2009, where he ran commercial operations, he had more than doubled the brand's market share there and tripled its revenue. Since taking the top U.S. leadership spot in 2009, van den Brink has engineered a turnaround. Sales of Heineken lager were floundering and market share had fallen, but thanks to steps like smart advertising for Dos Equis (you've no doubt seen the "Most Interesting Man" campaign), the U.S. portfolio is up 4.1% in volume since January.

<strong>Drink the Kool-Aid: </strong>He says he and his staff "have green blood."

<em>--Daniel Roberts</em><h1>Dolf van den Brink</h1>
<strong>President and CEO, Heineken U.S.</strong>

Call him the ultimate company man. The lanky Dutchman's first job with Heineken was as a commercial management trainee back in 1998, for which he spent six months as a "unit controller" in Helmond, Netherlands. He rose methodically, and by the time he left the Congo in 2009, where he ran commercial operations, he had more than doubled the brand's market share there and tripled its revenue. Since taking the top U.S. leadership spot in 2009, van den Brink has engineered a turnaround. Sales of Heineken lager were floundering and market share had fallen, but thanks to steps like smart advertising for Dos Equis (you've no doubt seen the "Most Interesting Man" campaign), the U.S. portfolio is up 4.1% in volume since January.

<strong>Drink the Kool-Aid: </strong>He says he and his staff "have green blood."

<em>--Daniel Roberts</em>
<h1>Dolf van den Brink</h1> <strong>President and CEO, Heineken U.S.</strong> Call him the ultimate company man. The lanky Dutchman's first job with Heineken was as a commercial management trainee back in 1998, for which he spent six months as a "unit controller" in Helmond, Netherlands. He rose methodically, and by the time he left the Congo in 2009, where he ran commercial operations, he had more than doubled the brand's market share there and tripled its revenue. Since taking the top U.S. leadership spot in 2009, van den Brink has engineered a turnaround. Sales of Heineken lager were floundering and market share had fallen, but thanks to steps like smart advertising for Dos Equis (you've no doubt seen the "Most Interesting Man" campaign), the U.S. portfolio is up 4.1% in volume since January. <strong>Drink the Kool-Aid: </strong>He says he and his staff "have green blood." <em>--Daniel Roberts</em>Photo: Thos Robinson/Getty Images
<h1>Dolf van den Brink</h1> <strong>President and CEO, Heineken U.S.</strong> Call him the ultimate company man. The lanky Dutchman's first job with Heineken was as a commercial management trainee back in 1998, for which he spent six months as a "unit controller" in Helmond, Netherlands. He rose methodically, and by the time he left the Congo in 2009, where he ran commercial operations, he had more than doubled the brand's market share there and tripled its revenue. Since taking the top U.S. leadership spot in 2009, van den Brink has engineered a turnaround. Sales of Heineken lager were floundering and market share had fallen, but thanks to steps like smart advertising for Dos Equis (you've no doubt seen the "Most Interesting Man" campaign), the U.S. portfolio is up 4.1% in volume since January. <strong>Drink the Kool-Aid: </strong>He says he and his staff "have green blood." <em>--Daniel Roberts</em>, Photo: Thos Robinson/Getty Images
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Dolf van den Brink

  • Age
    39
  • Title
    President and CEO
  • Company
    Heineken U.S.

Call him the ultimate company man. The lanky Dutchman’s first job with Heineken was as a commercial management trainee back in 1998, for which he spent six months as a “unit controller” in Helmond, Netherlands. He rose methodically, and by the time he left the Congo in 2009, where he ran commercial operations, he had more than doubled the brand’s market share there and tripled its revenue. Since taking the top U.S. leadership spot in 2009, van den Brink has engineered a turnaround. Sales of Heineken lager were floundering and market share had fallen, but thanks to steps like smart advertising for Dos Equis (you’ve no doubt seen the “Most Interesting Man” campaign), the U.S. portfolio is up 4.1% in volume since January. Drink the Kool-Aid: He says he and his staff “have green blood.” –Daniel Roberts

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