By Grace Dobush
August 22, 2018

The presidency of President Donald Trump has been nothing if not eventful. But even for an administration that makes news at a steady clip, Tuesday was extraordinary.

In an remarkable series of events, Trump’s longtime lawyer Michael Cohen admitted in court that—at the direction of then-candidate Trump—he arranged payments to two women in exchange for silence on their alleged affairs with Trump, in violation of campaign finance law. Meanwhile, Trump’s former campaign manager Paul Manafort was convicted of eight counts of tax fraud and bank fraud, a victory for special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into the administration’s wrongdoing. Since both men, at one point or another, had close ties to the president, their crimes cast a dark shadow on Trump. In fact, Cohen’s implicated the president directly.

The two events happened within minutes of each other, leaving newscasters breathless, setting Twitter afire, and prompting the president to decry the “witch hunts.”

But as is their daily duty, newspaper front pages captured the day’s news in a single broadsheet frame.

The Cohen and Manafort developments came too late in the day for many international front pages, but U.S. newspapers, of course, were all over it.

The U.K.’s Guardian newspaper called Tuesday Trump’s “worst hour.”

Trump was shaken by the judicial setbacks of two friends, says the cover of France’s Le Monde:

Canada’s National Post dedicated most of its front page to the revelations:

The New York Daily News, true to form, punned “All the president’s henchmen”:

The New York Times broke out the all-caps letterset:

The convictions tighten the squeeze on Trump, the Washington Post reported in a full-page Trump special:

The Wall Street Journal took the straight approach, as always:

The Miami Herald called it a one-two punch for the Trump administration:

USA Today kept it rather bland:

 

SPONSORED FINANCIAL CONTENT

You May Like

EDIT POST