Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., holds a news conference in the Capitol on Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017, to introduce legislation to ban the sale and possession of bump-stock equipment used to turn a semiautomatic weapon into an automatic one. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty)
Bill Clark CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

The cost has doubled and tripled at some outlets.

By Casey Quackenbush
October 6, 2017

Bump-stock prices have skyrocketed this week in response to growing support for restricting the device following the Las Vegas shooting. Sales of the accessory, which allows semi-automatic rifles to fire nearly at the rate of a machine gun, have doubled and tripled, according to Bloomberg.

The surge began on Wednesday as Republican lawmakers and the National Rifle Association announced they were open to restrictions on bump-stocks, a retreat from their traditional hardline stance on gun-control. Concern over a ban on bump-stocks has prompted a run on gun-retailers.

“The National Rifle Association is calling on the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (BATFE) to immediately review whether these devices comply with federal law. The NRA believes that devices designed to allow semi-automatic rifles to function like fully-automatic rifles should be subject to additional regulations,” the NRA said in a statement.

Officials found a dozen bump-stocks in the suite of Stephen Paddock, who opened fire on a country music festival on Sunday, killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 500, from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay resort.

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