People view the solar eclipse at Liberty State Island as the Lower Manhattan and One World Trade center are seen in the background in New York
People view the solar eclipse at Liberty State Island as the Lower Manhattan and One World Trade center are seen in the background in New York, U.S., August 21, 2017.Eduardo Munoz — Reuters
People view the solar eclipse at Liberty State Island as the Lower Manhattan and One World Trade center are seen in the background in New York
Solar Eclipse Visible Across Swath Of U.S.
A man takes a look at the solar eclipse at Liberty State Island as the Lower Manhattan and One World Trade center are seen in the background in New York
Spectators react to the total eclipse in the football stadium at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale
A woman views the solar eclipse through glasses and an iPhone at Times Square in Manhattan, New York
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Spectators watch the final moments before the total eclipse at the football stadium at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale
U.S. President Trump and family watch the solar eclipse from the White House in Washington
Solar Eclipse 2017
Eclipse White Hosue
Sessions and Ross watch the solar eclipse from the Truman Balcony at the White House in Washington
People watch the solar eclipse in downtown Hopkinsville
Eclipse California
Enthusiasts solar eclipse from Carroll Rim Trail at Painted Hills near Mitchell, Oregon
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Solar Eclipse from Depoe Bay, Oregon
Solar Eclipse from Depoe Bay, Oregon
People prepare to watch the solar eclipse at the Solartown Campground in Madras, Oregon
Madison the dog watches the solar eclipse in Nashville, Tennessee
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Eclipse Tennessee
Eclipse Oregon
Solar Eclipse In Hopkinsville, KY
Solar Eclipse Visible Across Swath Of U.S.
Eclipse Kentucky
Eclipse Nebraska
Solar Eclipse Visible Across Swath Of U.S.
Candace Marz and her son Gabriel Marz and Jean Garrett wait under the wing of a F-14A on the Naval museum ship U.S.S. Yorktown before festivities start for the Great American Eclipse in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina
A Star Wars storm trooper greets the marching band at the football stadium to watch the total solar eclipse at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale
Curt Lerner, Steve Pate-Newberry and Scott Hall from Sacramento, California test their drone in preparation for the solar eclipse, in Nashville
Catalina Gaitan
People ready for total solar eclipse
Man photographs Painted Hills in preparation for the total lunar eclipse near Mitchell, Oregon
Enthusiasts walk past a vehicle parked at Painted Hills  in preparation for total lunar eclipse near Mitchell, Oregon
Ken Spencer of Buckeye, Arizona, assists people as they look at the sun through a solar filter-equipped telescope at the Lowell Observatory Solar Eclipse Experience in Madras
People view the solar eclipse at Liberty State Island as the Lower Manhattan and One World Trade center are seen in the
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Eduardo Munoz — Reuters
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See What the Total Solar Eclipse Looks Like Across America

Updated: Aug 21, 2017 11:41 AM ET

We've only been waiting 38 years for the total solar eclipse of Aug. 21, commonly referred to as The Great American Eclipse—and the astronomical phenomenon has finally arrived.

People have flocked to 14 states across middle America from Oregon to South Carolina to get a prime viewing spot of the solar eclipse, wherein the moon will block the entire face of the sun and cause darkness. The many Airbnb bookings, Waffle Houses, hotels and flights offering solar eclipse deals prove how big of a deal this is. Some towns have even shut down their airports and football stadiums for viewing parties.

Unfortunately, only people in the United States will be able to see this event, with the solar eclipse estimated to start just after 10 a.m. PST in Oregon and end around 3 p.m. EST in South Carolina. Those people will get the ultimate eclipse experience: Two full minutes of sudden darkness, long enough for the air to feel noticeably colder. Even those who aren't in the path of the complete eclipse will experience a partial eclipse.

Click through the gallery above of the lucky people fortunate enough to travel or live in the best view of the path of the solar eclipse. We will continue to update the gallery throughout the day.

Bummed about missing this one? There's plenty of time to plan for the next U.S. eclipse on April 8, 2024. On that day, the shadow will across the country in an arc that starts in Texas and ends in Maine.

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