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The Broadsheet: March 21

Mar 21, 2017

Good morning, Broadsheet readers! Theresa May is in Vogue, some big-name female CEOs get a pay bump, and Ivanka Trump is getting an office in the West Wing. Enjoy your Tuesday.

EVERYONE'S TALKING

•  Making it official-ish. While Ivanka Trump's inclusion in numerous high-profile White House meetings has made it clear that she is playing a role in father's administration, her actual position has remained vague. It became a bit more formal last night, when the White House announced that Trump will get her own West Wing office. Axios reports that it will be next to that of her close adviser Dina Powell, who will remain in her same digs with her recent promotion from senior counselor for economic initiatives to deputy national security adviser for strategy.

The first daughter will also get security clearance for classified information. Although she will not have an official title and remains unbound by government ethics rules, Trump says she will "voluntarily" follow those restrictions. "I will continue to offer my father my candid advice and counsel, as I have for my entire life,” she said in the statement. “While there is no modern precedent for an adult child of the president, I will voluntarily follow all of the ethics rules placed on government employees." Fortune

ALSO IN THE HEADLINES

•  May's day. On March 29, British PM Theresa May will trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, the formal notification of the United Kingdom's intention to leave the European Union. To learn more about the woman steering the impending Brexit, check out this well-timed Vogue profile of May. While some observers remain underwhelmed by her practical, unshowy persona, the story concludes that those very qualities "may turn out to make her the most unusual politician of her time."

•  Raising the bar. Among the CEOs who got major pay bumps in fiscal 2016: HPE CEO Meg Whitman (from $17.1 million to $35.6 million), IBM CEO Ginni Rometty (from $19.8 million to $32.7 million), and Campbell Soup Co. CEO Denise Morrison (from $9.4 million to $12.9 million). WSJ

•  What's in a name? Retailer Modern Appealing Clothing has filed a class-action lawsuit against Ivanka Trump's brand, claiming that the company gets an unfair advantage because of its association with her name—and because of her name's association with the president of the U.S. Fortune

•  Women of the world. Foreign Policy's women's issue is out and includes a blockbuster package of female-focused features. Among the stories that caught my eye: A look at the women supporting nationalist movements around the world, how the gag rule that bans the U.S. from funding any healthcare initiative tied to abortion is impacting women in Africa, and a profile of a Kenyan woman who is pursuing justice for victims of sexual violence. Foreign Policy

•  All hail the editor-in-chief. Joanne Lipman, chief content officer of publishing giant Gannett, has been promoted to editor-in-chief of the company's flagship publication, USA Today—making her the first-ever woman to hold that title. Fortune

MOVERS AND SHAKERS: Flywheel Sports has appointed Geralyn Coopersmith chief content officer.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

•  The Thinx saga. The saga of Miki Argawal, co-founder of period underwear company Thinx, continues. Chelsea Leibow, the company's former head of PR, has filed a complaint with the City of New York Commission on Human Rights alleging that Agrawal touched an employee’s breasts and asked her to expose them, routinely changed clothes in front of employees, and conducted meetings via videoconference while in bed, apparently unclothed—among other offenses. Argawal denies the claims, calling them “baseless.” New York Magazine

•  A beautiful weekend. Beauty and the Beast just had the seventh-biggest domestic opening weekend of all time. Women accounted for 60% of those ticket buyers, demonstrating both the economic might of female audiences and women-led films. The Hollywood Reporter

•  YouTube makes an edit. After users complained that YouTube's family-friendly “restricted mode” was filtering out some LGBT videos, the Susan Wojcicki-led company apologized, tweeting: "Some videos have been incorrectly labeled, and that’s not right. We’re on it!" New York Times

•  Play ball! A new all-female baseball team is giving a few residents of the Gaza Strip the rare opportunity to play sports in a region where athletics are still out of reach for most women. WSJ

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ON MY RADAR

If you think workplace flexibility makes women vulnerable, you're wrong Thrive Global

Beyond Roe vs. Wade: Here's what Gorsuch means for abortion Bloomberg

Is Huda Kattan the Kim Kardashian West of beauty bloggers? New York Times

Meryl Streep has been turned into an incredible meme Harper's Bazaar

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