The Great Business Model Correction continues.

Earlier this week, Munchery, one of San Francisco’s many meal delivery startups, finally began to serve lunch in addition to its dinner service— but it’s expanding conservatively. While other so-called “on-demand” food delivery services let customers order food on a whim and deliver it as soon as it’s ready, Munchery customers will have to pre-order lunches the night before, at the latest. What’s more, the company is only making lunch available to office workers whose employers have signed up to regularly order through Munchery, and each day it will deliver the meals all at once—all in the name of efficient operations and predictability.

In other words: Munchery wants to minimize any losses on its new endeavor, unlike competitors that ferry burritos, salads, and everything in between to individual customers.

Thanks to Uber’s success, we’ve seen an explosion of startups over the last several years that let consumers order anything from a ride to groceries to flowers by merely tapping an app.

But these business models have proven much more challenging than they seem. Several have closed shop, and many of the remaining ones are now making significant adjustments in the search of more sustainable businesses—and hopefully, someday, profitability.

With investor appetite for these startups seemingly declining, according to data published in July by CB Insights, it’s no surprise that many are looking for an exit from the venture capitalist subsidy-driven growth that was once popular.

The only remaining question is whether the startups can do it without hiking the price of their services and alienating customers who are not young, Silicon Valley dwellers with a lot of disposable income.

Kia Kokalitcheva


This is the Startup Sunday edition of Data Sheet,Fortune’s daily tech newsletter, edited by reporter Kia Kokalitcheva. You may reach me via Twitter, email, or an entirely new platform that your startup developed. Feedback welcome.