As a group, Goldman Sachs’ interns expect to own their first house before they have children or get married.

That’s in their twenties, according to a Tuesday survey from the banking giant, which shows that the majority of Goldman Sachs summer 2016 interns expect to marry and have children in their thirties, but own a home in the big two-zero.

Roughly 66% of the bank’s global 2016 summer intern class responded to the bank’s questions ranging from their health and wellness habits, to the messaging app they can’t live without (most, 22%, said WhatsApp). They are college and graduate students who have worked in offices in the Americas, Asia Pacific, Europe, the Middle East, and Africa.

Keep in mind the Goldman Sachs internship is one of the most competitive out there. The company regularly posts an acceptance rate for summer interns around 2%, while the Financial Times reported earlier this year that the number of applicants for Goldman internships surged to 233,849 this summer.

For comparison, Harvard University’s acceptance rate was 5.4% for the class of 2020. According to social job data platform, Glassdoor, summer interns can earn the equivalent of a $62,000 to $77,000 annual salary—though they’re only at Goldman Sachs for for under three of those months.

 

screen-shot-2016-09-06-at-4-26-41-pm

 

For comparison, the average U.S. first-time homebuyer between 2010 and 2013 was 32.5 years old, according to real estate analysis firm, Zillow. Some studies, such as one from the Terner Center for Housing Innovation, suggest that young American’s are abstaining from homeownership by choice due to declining rates of marriage.

Though the majority of Goldman Sachs interns also expect to get married in their 30s, the average age in the U.S. has steadily rose to 27 years-old among women, and 29 years-old among men.

Between 2011 and 2013, the average age of having their first children was 25.4 for men, and 22.8 for women.