A Jeep Cherokee undergoes assembly at the Chrysler Toledo North Assembly Plant.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images
By Kirsten Korosec
July 22, 2016

Updated at 6:50 p.m. ET to explain how software update will fix the issue.

Fiat Chrysler says it is recalling 323,000 vehicles in the U.S. after discovering a defect that could cause the vehicles to lose the ability to move forward.

The company, which issued the recall Friday, says it’s unaware of any related injuries or accidents. A total of 410,000 vehicles are impacted by the recall including 36,000 vehicles in Canada, 7,000 in Mexico, and 44,000 outside the NAFTA region.

FCA (fcau) says it discovered a problem in a wire harness, which could lead to a fault code. Once that fault code is detected it could cut propulsion to the vehicle. The company has updated the software to solve the problem. The software update enables “limp mode” which will allow the driver to safely get off the road while protecting the vehicle from damage incurred by continued use after a fault occurs, a spokesman explained via email.

Customers who have certain vehicles that may be affected by this rare chain of events, will be advised to schedule service and get the update, the spokesman said.

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The problem can be temporarily resolved by stopping the vehicle and restarting the engine, according to FCA. Affected cars are the model-year 2015 Chrysler 200 midsize sedans, Ram ProMaster City small vans, Jeep Renegade, and Cherokee SUVs. Certain model-year 2014 Cherokees are also part of the recall, FCA says.

Vehicles built after Sept. 23, 2014 aren’t subject to the recall because the company has since changed the harness manufacturing process that caused the problem.

Google and Fiat’s autonomous minivan could be a hit:

Earlier this year, Fiat Chrysler recalled 1.1 million vehicles worldwide because of a software problem that could cause some vehicles roll away after drivers exit. The issue has been linked to 41 injuries, 212 crashes, and 308 reports of property damage.

The automaker said in June it would speed up a repair to the software in the recalled vehicles. The upgraded software includes an “Auto Park” feature designed to prevent drivers from failing to place the transmission into park before exiting the vehicle. FCA had previously said the fix to the software wouldn’t be ready until the fourth quarter.

Updated at 6:50 p.m. ET to explain how software update will fix the issue. The software is the solution, not the issue.

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