T-Mobile C.E.O. John Legere
Photograph by Steve Sands—WireImage/Getty Images

Latest unconventional marketing move from controversial CEO.

By Aaron Pressman
May 6, 2016

Trash-talking T-Mobile CEO John Legere was up to his old tricks on Thursday, buying the rights to put a temporary tattoo on track star Nick Symmonds’ right shoulder for the upcoming racing season.

After winning the spot on eBay for $21,800, Legere took to Twitter to conduct a quick poll among his almost 2.5 million followers to decide what the tattoo should say. Legere’s four options were his company’s slogan “#WeWontStop” with a magenta T, the American flag, “I Run Good,” and “F^@% AT&T” with his personal emoji.

The final option was well ahead in the poll on Friday, garnering 47% of the votes, with the flag in second place at 25%.

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Legere has built T-Mobile tmus into the fastest growing U.S. mobile carrier with lower prices, better terms, and a string of promotions. And he’s also built T-Mobile’s business by adroitly using a combination of free publicity and social media attention, including frequent Twitter battles with rival CEOs. Last month he posted to Twitter a rap mashup of the Afroman song “Because I Got High” with clips from Verizon CFO Fran Shammo’s comments to analysts.

Two-time Olympian Symmonds will wear whatever tattoo Legere picks for six races. But the Olympics bans athletes from displaying logos and messaging from companies like T-Mobile that aren’t official sponsors, so Symmonds might have to cover the mark if he makes it to the global games a third time. Legere’s bitter rival, AT&T t , has been an Olympic sponsor for the past decade.

Symmonds, who already sports a logo of his caffeinated-gum company on his left shoulder, has long battled with track authorities over sponsorships and marketing deals. In February, he sued USA Track & Field over requirements to wear certain shoe and apparel brands.

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