Supermodel Alek Wek at New York Fashion Week.
Photograph by Daniel C Sims—Getty Images

Intel installs its Curie chips into a Chromat Aeros sports bra to make clothing more connected at New York Fashion Week 2015.

By Andrew Nusca
September 25, 2015

WHAT: A high-tech undergarment that walked the runway at New York Fashion Week.

UNDERWIRED: Embedded in it are Intel INTC Curie chips, tiny circuits packed with motion sensors, wireless radios, and battery-charging abilities.

SMART SUPPORT: Triggered by changes in the wearer’s perspiration, respiration, and body temperature, the garment’s electronics adjust built-in vents made of a shape-memory alloy to warm or cool the wearer.

ACTIVEWEAR: Global spending on wearable tech could total $19 billion by 2018, per Juniper Research. “Fabric is challenging,” says Intel vice president Ayse Ildeniz. “It must be washed. It’s price sensitive.”

SWEAT EQUITY: Having missed the mobile revolution, Intel hopes Curie will help it ride the next computing wave. “How do I make sure your smart shirt works with the other tech you’re wearing?” Ildeniz asks. “Standards, interoperability—to technologists, that’s incredibly difficult.”

A version of this article appears in the October 1, 2015 issue of Fortune magazine with the headline “Wearable. Wireless. Web-ready.”

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