General Motors announced four new car recalls on Friday covering more than 105,000 vehicles, adding to the string of bad news out of the automaker about defective auto parts.

The latest recall brings the number this year to 34. In all, nearly 16 million cars worldwide have been recalled, including 13.9 million in the U.S.

On Thursday, GM released the results of an internal investigation showing that the company failed to react for nearly a decade after learning about the defective auto parts. A faulty ignition switch led to at least 13 deaths and dozens of crashes. In the wake of the probe, the company fired 15 employees, including several ranking executives, citing misconduct or failure to act. (The probe results also led Fortune to posit that GM could, feasibly, be charged with manslaughter in connection with the deaths.)

GM CEO Mary Barra, who was called in front of Congress earlier this year to testify on the previous botched recall, said Thursday that the company expected more call-backs to be announced this year. In Friday’s announcement, the company said it is recalling 57,512 Chevrolet Silverados and GMC Sierras from 2014, as well as Chevrolet Silverado, Suburban, Tahoe and GMC Sierra and Yukon models from 2015. Those recalls are related to problems with base radios that prevent drivers from receiving audible warnings when the key is in the ignition and the driver-side door is open.

Another 31,520 Buick Verano and the Chevrolet Camaro, Cruze and Sonic cars from 2012 are also being recalled because of a defect that could prevent the driver’s air bag from being deployed. The company said it is aware of one injury crash related to the problem. There were a number of other crashes in which the air bags did not deploy. But GM said it isn’t sure whether that was the result of a defect.

Other recalls announced Friday include 61 Chevrolet Sparks from 2013 and 2014, and Buick Encores from 2013 that are the result of a passenger-side air bag defect. Thirty three Chevrolet Corvettes from 2014 are also being recalled because of an internal short-circuit in the sensing and diagnostic module.

On the flip side, GM also announced May sales numbers this week that did not seem to be too adversely affected by the string of recalls or the record fine of $35 million levied against the company last month by the U.S. Department of Transportation. GM’s sold 284,694 cars in the U.S. in May, good for a 13% increase over the same month last year, representing the company’s best month since August 2008 as auto sales across the country spiked last month.