Stem cell dollars: California leads the way

Sep 28, 2012


<strong>Ray and Dagmar Dolby Regeneration Medicine Building </strong>

UCSF, San Francisco 

<strong>Benefactor: </strong>Ray and Dagmar Dolby 

<strong>$36 million </strong>

<strong>Science: <strong></strong> </strong>It required $123 million to build this architectural marvel alongside a bedrock hill. UCSF researchers are renowned for the progress they're making on potential therapies for neurologic diseases like multiple sclerosis.
Ray and Dagmar Dolby Regeneration Medicine Building UCSF, San Francisco Benefactor: Ray and Dagmar Dolby $36 million Science: It required $123 million to build this architectural marvel alongside a bedrock hill. UCSF researchers are renowned for the progress they're making on potential therapies for neurologic diseases like multiple sclerosis.

Ray and Dagmar Dolby Regeneration Medicine Building UCSF, San Francisco Benefactor: Ray and Dagmar Dolby $36 million Science: It required $123 million to build this architectural marvel alongside a bedrock hill. UCSF researchers are renowned for the progress they're making on potential therapies for neurologic diseases like multiple sclerosis.

<strong>Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center </strong>

UC Irvine, Irvine, Calif.

<strong>Benefactor: </strong>Sue and Bill Gross 

<strong>$10 million</strong>

<strong>Science: </strong>This center used green and recycled building materials to achieve LEED Platinum certification. The center's marquee projects involve the exploration of treatments for the effects of Alzheimer's disease and spinal-cord injury.
Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center UC Irvine, Irvine, Calif. Benefactor: Sue and Bill Gross $10 million Science: This center used green and recycled building materials to achieve LEED Platinum certification. The center's marquee projects involve the exploration of treatments for the effects of Alzheimer's disease and spinal-cord injury.

Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center UC Irvine, Irvine, Calif. Benefactor: Sue and Bill Gross $10 million Science: This center used green and recycled building materials to achieve LEED Platinum certification. The center's marquee projects involve the exploration of treatments for the effects of Alzheimer's disease and spinal-cord injury.

<strong>The Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research</strong>

UCLA, Los Angeles<strong> </strong>

<strong>Benefactor: </strong>The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation 

<strong>$20 million </strong>

<strong>Science:<strong></strong> </strong>UCLA researchers are making demonstrable inroads against melanoma. With a series of CIRM grants, they've progressed from basic research and are poised to embark on clinical trials to treat the deadly form of skin cancer.
The Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research UCLA, Los Angeles Benefactor: The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation $20 million Science: UCLA researchers are making demonstrable inroads against melanoma. With a series of CIRM grants, they've progressed from basic research and are poised to embark on clinical trials to treat the deadly form of skin cancer.

The Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research UCLA, Los Angeles Benefactor: The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation $20 million Science: UCLA researchers are making demonstrable inroads against melanoma. With a series of CIRM grants, they've progressed from basic research and are poised to embark on clinical trials to treat the deadly form of skin cancer.

<strong>The Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research Building </strong>

Stanford University, Palo Alto 

<strong>Benefactor: </strong>Lorry I. Lokey 

<strong>$75 million </strong>

<strong>Science:<strong></strong> </strong>Stanford University has received more than $260 million in CIRM funding to date, part of which went toward constructing a striking facility complete with a (donated) two-ton Chihuly sculpture. Researchers here are finding new ways to battle cancer stem cells and develop therapies for neurologic diseases and stroke.
The Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research Building Stanford University, Palo Alto Benefactor: Lorry I. Lokey $75 million Science: Stanford University has received more than $260 million in CIRM funding to date, part of which went toward constructing a striking facility complete with a (donated) two-ton Chihuly sculpture. Researchers here are finding new ways to battle cancer stem cells and develop therapies for neurologic diseases and stroke.

The Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research Building Stanford University, Palo Alto Benefactor: Lorry I. Lokey $75 million Science: Stanford University has received more than $260 million in CIRM funding to date, part of which went toward constructing a striking facility complete with a (donated) two-ton Chihuly sculpture. Researchers here are finding new ways to battle cancer stem cells and develop therapies for neurologic diseases and stroke.

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